Finally, snow.

It’s been a mild winter. I woke today to the sense that the world was brighter. It was. Snow fell overnight and heavily at times this morning.

Wakeup bright light.

Wakeup bright light.

We have a saying here: “Big snow: little snow; little snow: big snow.”  We were getting big snow(flakes) so, if the saying were true, it wasn’t going to amount to much. It didn’t.  Do you have that saying where you live?

 

snowflakes, winter, Vernon Bridge, shed, clothesline

Snowflakes, winter, Vernon Bridge, shed, clothesline

Big snowflakes with the open river in the background.

 

On Monday, the second day of spring, we are forecast to get “little snow” and perhaps our most significant snowfall this ‘winter.’  Stay tuned.

Posted for iPhriday coordinated by the lovely blogger at Gray Days and Coffee.

Confession: I didn’t even leave the house to take these photos with my iPhone 6 using Huemore.

iPhriday Phog (again)

A week ago the temperature swung from -20 Celsius to +10 Celsius in 36 hours.  Result: Fog (Phog)

This first photo looks upriver past our shoreline at the right and includes open water, ice breaking in lines parallel to the shore, and water over ice in the background.

IMG_1694

During a real winter the “pond” on the right freezes and pick-up hockey games have been held on it. But the last time I saw one of those was at least 10 years ago.  The pond drains away in spring and all but its bottom is planted with whatever is grown in that field in that summer.  Mr. IDWE in the yellow slicker.

IMG_1688

Farm buildings obscured by the weather.

Phog

Phog

 

Shot Wednesday, February 17, for iPhriday on Feb 19 with an iPhone 6 and quickly uploaded before I headed to the airport to catch a flight to Cuba.  WordPress was totally uncooperative; the pictures weren’t visible in the media library or in the draft, so I had to abandon the post.  I’m back now and the photos did eventually finish uploading so here it is, one week late.

The Pownal Escarpment on iPhriday

(Post-post edit: All day I’ve thought it was Friday. Took the iPhone to town with me, planned photos on the way home, posted this evening. I just realized it’s Thursday.  Ahhh the joys of being retired.)

As you drive along the shore road between the Town of Stratford and my home, 20 km away, the Pownal Escarpment is the rise of land to the north.

Western part of the Pownal Escarpment

Western part of the Pownal Escarpment

Driving home along the Pownal Escarpment

Driving home along the Pownal Escarpment

In the next photo you can see a snowmobile trail crossing from one field to the next parallel to the top of the slope.

East end of the Pownal Escarpment

East end of the Pownal Escarpment

It’s not a very impressive escarpment compared with the Great Rift Valley or the Niagara Escarpment over which Niagara Falls tumbles.  An escarpment is simply a steep slope or long cliff that occurs from faulting, tilting or warping  and separates two relatively level areas of differing elevations.  All the slopes have been farmed for more than a century, some just up to the point where it became too steep, and where trees remain. Over the past 40 years several impressive and very expensive houses have been built at the top of the slope.

The pictures were taken with an iPhone 6 from my (stopped) car as I was driving back from iPhriday grocery shopping. I stopped about four times to take photos and not once did a car pass me on the whole drive!

For those of you who follow my blog, you will remember CauliPhlower from a couple of weeks ago. The price has gone down significantly.  They could just as easily have put 6.99 under the x-ed out price!

I bought one!

I bought one!

Posted for iPhriday a brainchild of Gray Days and Coffee,  who posts lovely photos all the time,whether with her iPhone or something more substantial!

Vibrance in the Storm

Yellow! Burdock, waiting to catch my clothes come spring.

Yellow! Burdock, waiting to catch my clothes come spring.

Yesterday I posted Black and White pictures from the start of a heavy wet snowfall.

While I was out in the snow, I also shot some vibrant bits that caught my eye.

Persistent apples that turn from yellow to orange as the winter progresses.

Persistent apples that turn from yellow to orange as the winter progresses.

It must have been warmer under the pines because the snow there was melting.

Green! It must have been warmer under the pines because the snow there was melting.

Tomato cage with leftover orange hemp support twine.

Pink! Tomato cage with leftover orange hemp support twine.

Rose hips on Rosa rubra

Orange! Rose hips on Rosa rubra

Rose hips on a shrub rose that reverted to its rootstock. I think it's an invasive and I'm debating on digging it up.

Red and Black. Rose hips on a shrub rose that reverted to its rootstock. I think it’s an invasive and I’m debating on digging it up.

And finally, our out buildings which are more vibrant when you aren’t looking at them through heavy snow!

Our Indian Red outbuildings with blue trim.

Our Indian Red outbuildings with blue trim.

To see how vibrant things are for other WordPress bloggers participating in this week’s photo challenge, have a look here.

 

All photos taken with a Pentax K3 and a Tamron 28-200 mm lens – several at 200 mm which is a 300 mm equivalent on the Pentax crop sensor. One of the reasons I shoot with the Pentax is that it is weatherproof.

Our Phirst iPhriday Storm

Victoria Row: a pedestrian street in the warmer months.

Victoria Row: a pedestrian street in the warmer months.

I was in Charlottetown doing errands when the predicted snow began. The iPhone has just the right shutter speed for catching snowflakes.

These eateries are  just around the corner from the Connolly Block, below.  I remembered a story from my work days 30 years ago. The man charged with deciding whether the weather was bad enough to close our department had a view of the top of the Connolly Block from his office. When he couldn’t see Mr. Connolly’s head anymore – either because the visibility was down to zero or his head was enveloped in snow – he sent us home.

The Connolly Block, 1885

The Connolly Block, 1885

After driving home, and lunch, I went for a walk in our yard with two cameras, my Pentax and my iPhone.

Austrian Pine with wet snow three hours later.

Austrian Pine with wet snow three hours later.

Since these are posted for iPhriday, I am only showing the iPhone ones: shot with Hueless and edited in Photos on the iPhone. I’ll probably post a couple from the Pentax later this weekend.

Vernon Bridge + three hours - white spruce.

Vernon Bridge + three hours – white spruce.

Fog ‘n Feather

Wouldn’t that make a good name for a pub?

Fog:

March 10, 2015: Everything was frosty and as it warmed up the frozen fog drifted across the river.

Frosty Morn Vernon Bridge

Frosty Morn Vernon Bridge

Feather:

There’s a sad story behind this.

February 16, 2015, in the midst of a blizzard, one of our resident bald eagles was lunching on a hapless and rapidly more featherless Canada Goose. The feathers blew three quarters of the way around the house: eastwards in the backyard, southerly along the side and then westerly across the front. This feather lodged on the rose bush (Blanche Double de Coubert if you are really keen) until early summer. Photo taken through a dirty blizzardy window. You can also see it in the lower right corner of wider angle shot.  (Those little dark spheres are from the crab apple just off scene, stage left.)

Mid-February Blizzard Goose Feather

Mid-February Blizzard
Goose Feather

 

Mid-February Blizzard - View out the front window.

Mid-February Blizzard – View out the front window.

Posted, a week late, for the WordPress photo challenge Weight(less) and you can see more entries here.

Light at the end of the snow tunnel

March 16 Blizzard

After the March 16, 2015, blizzard

WordPress’s weekly photo challenge this week is Victory. Our most significant victory in the last year was the one over winter. From early February to late March the snow kept coming, one blizzard after another. It was a winter that folks in the northeast of North America won’t soon forget.

The snow blower has done all it can; now to shovel the rest.

Cleaning up after the March 16 Blizzard

The photos above were taken as we prepared to dig out after the big blast of March 16 and half way through the work. The photos below were taken after we had liberated our front door and one of two cars. Thank goodness someone blows out most of our drive. Victory!

The front door is accessible.

The front door is now accessible

After the March 16 Blizzard - One car out, one more to go.

One car out, one more to go.

You can see entries celebrating many other types of victories here.

I lied

I lied. I do not wander everywhere.

For the last two days I have stayed home through a blizzard, and then to shovel.

Back yard, mini-barn and snow patterns.

Back yard, mini-barn and snow patterns.

View out back deck door before shovelling half of deck.

View out back deck door before shovelling half of deck.

Interesting snow patterns made by wind swirling around trees.

Interesting snow patterns made by wind swirling around trees.

Mini-barn (aka garden shed) from upstairs window. Note the clothesline barely above the snow level.

Mini-barn (aka garden shed) from upstairs window. Note the clothesline barely above the snow level.

This is what it looked like through our side door:

Side door before shovelling.

Side door before shovelling.

This is what it looked like after our plough/blower farmer/neightbour was by, and after a couple of hours of shovelling:

House, cars (Toyota still buried) and outbuildings, mid-shovel.

House, cars (Toyota still buried) and outbuildings, mid-shovel.

The front door, after shovelling.

The front door, after shovelling.

The drive, after being blown out.

The drive, after being blown out.

We got about 45 cm of snow on Monday and are expecting 20 cm more tomorrow.

We’ve had a record snowfall on Prince Edward Island this winter, most of it since the end of January.

 

 

 

Pine Siskins in Blizzard

Birds in Blizzard-8137

Where I used to live, on a more wooded lot about 50 km west of where I live now, there were Pine Siskins every winter. This is the first year I’ve noticed them here in Vernon Bridge. They’re about the same size as the Redpolls and a little smaller than the Goldfinch. They too travel in flocks, and there are probably about 20 around our feeders. They’re very aggressive, particularly with each other.

Pine Siskins

Pine Siskins

So, if you bird lovers are wondering what else we saw during the blizzard at the feeder (you couldn’t see beyond the feeders!) there were starlings at one point, crows and the occasional chickadee.