Athabaska Falls 4 – Trees

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Along with the grandeur and noise of the falls were scenes of survival, and not, of the conifers along the river.

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

Athabaska Falls, Jasper National Park

This is the fourth and last post on Jasper National Park’s Athabaska falls: One, Two, Three can be found at the links.

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IPhriday – Low Tide

Looking south

Looking south – the shore is the part that’s reflecting (on the left,) and in front of the trees on the other side. The water is the grungy bit in the middle.  The dark parts are exposed river bed.

There was a storm surge today in Maritime Canada caused by an extreme low pressure system and the fact that we have just had a new moon – when tides are most extreme. There was extensive damage in the Bay of Fundy, but none that I’ve heard of in PEI. The high winds didn’t help.  The converse of the extra-high tide is an extra-low tide, which we noticed around supper time.

Looking North

Looking North – the shore is the part that’s reflecting on the right and the mottled part in the middle. The river is flowing on the left.

Looking North

Looking North from closer to the bridge: the shore and river are more obvious in this photo.

This post is late for the WordPress Photo Challenge of April 1 on the subject of Landscape and you can see other entries here.

Looking west

Looking west – Not so much a photo of the low tide, but you can see a gravel bar on the far side of the river and if you click on the photo to enlarge it you will notice a lone Canada Goose (we think it’s injured) in the river current.

This post is also for the iPhriday challenge begun by Gray Days and Coffee. You can look for other iPhriday participants by searching for the category or the tags.  The three wide photos were taken on an iPhone 6 using Hueless and edited in Lightroom on an iMac and the fourth was taken with the iPhone Camera.

 

Manhattan Monday 40 – Historic Seaport

The South Street Seaport  (and here for Wikipedia) is a going concern in Manhattan where Fulton Street meets the East River.  It  includes Pier 17 and buildings around and landward of it. It appears from the website link that it will look very different by 2017.  I must visit again!

South Street Seaport Museum

South Street Seaport Museum

In 2014 there was a museum, some nautical craftwork and a ship, the name of which I did not note. We tend to be walking tourists rather than gawking tourists so we didn’t go into the museum.

South Street Seaport Museum buildings

South Street Seaport Museum buildings

The sign reads: "WORK IN PROGRESS - Figurehead for the ...." and the rest seems to have been rubbed out!

The sign reads: “WORK IN PROGRESS – Figurehead for the ….” and the rest seems to have been rubbed out!

A ship in need of a figurehead?

A ship in need of a figurehead?

On the riverside itself, near the ferry terminal, was this service, positively reinforcing the idea of carrying your own water bottle.

East River water station.

East River water station.

Manhattan Monday 32 – Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge

The Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge opened in 1909.   The main bridge is 3,725 feet long, the longest of the East River Bridges. The overall length of the bridge, including the Manhattan and Queens approaches, is 7,449 feet.

I haven’t been over or under it but I took two photos from the Empire State Building in 2013 which show it.

The bridge is to the right of the Chrysler building.

The bridge is to the right of the Chrysler building.

And showing more of the Brooklyn end.

Showing more of the Queensboro end.

There is a lookout at the end of East 55th Street which offers a lovely view of boat traffic on the East River and of the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge just upstream. The lookout is only a few blocks from The Pod Hotel 51 (on East 51st!) where we stayed in both 2013 and 2015.

From a lookout at the end of East 55th Street, Manhattan.

New York City June 2013 – From a lookout at the end of East 55th Street, Manhattan.

 

Previous posts on Manhattan bridges can be found here: The Brooklyn Bridge and the Manhattan Bridge.

Manhattan Monday 31 – Manhattan Bridge

Empire State Building NYC June 2013

Empire State Building NYC June 2013

The bridge in the photo above is the Manhattan Bridge, the middle of three (Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg: BMW) bridges spanning the East River.

Last week I showed the Brooklyn Bridge, but forgot to mention that it had been completed in 1883;  of course Wikipedia can provide more information if you’re curious.

These three shots of the Manhattan bridge, opened in 1909, were taken from the East River ferry as we approached the bridge and passed under it. In the first, the Brooklyn bridge is in the background.

 

Manhattan Bridge

New York City – Manhattan Bridge

Under the Manhattan Bridge on the East River Ferry

Under the Manhattan Bridge on the East River Ferry

 

Under the bridge on the East River Ferry.

Under the bridge on the East River Ferry. New York City Sony RX100M3

And this final photo was taken in June of 2015:

Manhattan Bridge from the roof of a tour bus.

Manhattan Bridge from the roof of a tour bus.

Careful! Spider Webs

Normally we are awed by spider webs, the seemingly careful and measured nets which spiders weave to catch their prey. This one’s pretty careful:

Fog in Vernon Bridge

Fog in Vernon Bridge

On a foggy morning about two weeks ago I hurried out to catch the landscape in fog – not taking a tripod for closer shots.

Fog in Vernon Bridge - looking north from the middle of the highway

Fog in Vernon Bridge – looking north from the middle of the highway

As I returned to the house I spotted some spider webs and was careful not to run into them while I tried carefully to shoot them, hand-held, without lens flare. However, the spiders didn’t seem to have been careful at all – throwing webs across pines, spruce and grass – perhaps in a last ditch effort to get food before frost and winter set in.

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs  on Austrian Pine

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs on Austrian Pine

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs  on Austrian Pine

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs on Austrian Pine

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs  on white spruce.

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs on white spruce.

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs  on white spruce.

Fog in Vernon Bridge and spider webs on white spruce.

Even webs on grass.

Even webs on grass.

For more interpretations of “careful”, visit the WordPress Photo Challenge web page posted on Friday, October 23.

And if it’s foggy where you are, slow down and drive more carefully than usual.

Manhattan Monday 18 Tunnels

Within Central Park, and between the Hudson River Greenway and the west side of Manhattan, are tunnels to allow pedestrians and cyclists to cross roads heavily travelled by cars. In some parts of the world these passages are called subways.

Within Central Parksomewhere near the Carousel.

Within Central Park, somewhere near the Carousel.

This way to the Hudson River Greenway, under the Henry Hudson Parkway.

This way to the Hudson River Greenway, under the Henry Hudson Parkway.

As this post is being published, we are once again in San Francisco, visiting the triplets and their parents, and I’m probably amassing more photos of that captivating city.