Manhattan Monday 24 – Chinatown 3

Random shots taken in Chinatown in September, 2014.

New York City, new camera, Shopping

New York City, new camera, Shopping

New York City, new camera, Photo bombed

New York City, new camera, Photo bombed

New York City, new camera, souvenirs

New York City, New camera, Souvenirs

Sometimes the photographer ends up in the shot…

New York City, new camera, door reflections

New York City, New camera, Door Reflections

Manhattan Monday #10

Midtown Manhattan Conference

Midtown Manhattan Conference

It’s pretty hard to do street photography, which concentrates on people, from the top of a bus. Just when you think you have a shot lined up, the light changes and the bus moves. Or a truck moves between you and your subject. Or there’s a parked car blocking part of the shot (as with the photo below).

New York City Street  Corner in Midtown

New York City Street Corner in Midtown

Photos taken from the top of a Hop-On, Hop-Off bus in Midtown Manhattan on a very hot June day with a Sony RX100III.

Streetside Zhongshan

Zhongshan 2013

Zhongshan, a block or two from the river in the previous post.

Scooters, the transport of choice, unless you happen to have a tricycle:

Efficient transportation and parking.

Efficient transportation and parking.

Oven mitt hand-protectors!

Oven mitt hand-protectors!

A working tricycle: recycling

A working tricycle: recycling

Back on the hotel side of the bridge – street vendors.

In colour and cropped.

In colour and cropped.

In Black and White and not cropped.

In Black and White and not cropped.

In the background, the pedestrian bridge we crossed.

In the background, the pedestrian bridge we crossed.

Zhongshan 2013

Yangshuo Street Photography

This woman was so tired and couldn't keep her eyes open, yet she had to look after the baby. I felt sorry for her, but wasn't in the market for knives!

This woman was so tired and couldn’t keep her eyes open, yet she had to look after the baby. I felt sorry for her, but wasn’t in the market for knives!

The same photo in Black and White, which I prefer.

Guilin

Another sleepy vendor.

Another sleepy vendor.

They say that street photography gets easier over time. Not wanting to be too obvious about shooting people, I tried a few from the hip. This one is the only one I liked.

Shot from the hip.

Shot from the hip.

At last, we headed out of the heat and back to our hotel for Chinese massages before the evening light show. No photos of the massages!

Leaving the market, anxious to get out of the heat.

Leaving the market, anxious to get out of the heat.

Just outside the market, mid afternoon, so no food customers.

Just outside the market, mid afternoon, so no customers.

Chongqing Street Photography

At least one pig isn't flying.

At least one pig isn’t flying.

All flying!

All flying! But no pigs.

Giant pinwheels.

Giant pinwheels.

At the intersection of the two major streets making up this shopping precinct was a giant monument, which also shows up in the first photo in the previous post. It must have been a meeting place, because most people were scanning the swirling crowd.

Waiting for ....

Waiting for ….

I don’t recall seeing food vendors on the high-end pedestrian streets, but there must have been at least one just beyond where our bus was parked. The next two photos were taken from the bus window before we pulled away from Chongqing. The girl with the hat caught my eye and grinned.

A style of her own!

A style of her own!

At  least the garbage was in the bin!

At least the garbage was in the bin!

Next China post – Chongqing children

Still Shopping in Chongqing

This was a the end of the week long celebrations of the founding of the People's Republic.  The crowds were huge.

This was at the end of the week-long celebrations of the founding of the People’s Republic. The crowds were huge.

Because there were so many people out and about in Chongqing, we were not taken to the touristy spot which was on our itinerary; I don’t even know what the spot was supposed to be!  Our local guide had been told it was overly crowded.  The guides’ solution was to drop us off in a shopping precinct. As someone who generally dislikes shopping, I did not warmly welcome this solution – but hey – it yielded great photo opportunities.

More crowds, more smog.

More crowds, more smog.

At one point we went inside a shopping complex to look for toilets.

Inside one of the less ritzy shopping centres on the street.

Inside one of the less ritzy shopping centres in the neighbourhood.

Another view from inside the same building.

Another view from inside the same building.

And part way through our stay we partook of another American brand – which is not mentioned in its English version in these photos!

It was a welcome relief to have somewhere to sit down and get away from the crowds.  And the Chinese script on the ads was refreshing.

It was a welcome relief to have somewhere to sit down and get away from the crowds. And the Chinese script on the ads was refreshing.

A lovely hand-drawn sign.

A lovely hand-drawn sign.

Next Chinese post: More Chongqing street photography.

Conspicuous Consumption Chongqing

Ah, Mont Blanc. I still dream of owning one some day.

Ah, Mont Blanc. I still dream of owning one of you some day.

The ads and the high-end stores would have you believe that much money is being spent in China on luxury goods.  Our tour guides told us several times that Chinese people with money do like to show it off.  We found that branded goods –  at least the ones we looked at: Apple products, and cameras – were much more expensive in China.

The faded look to the buildings is because of - your guessed it - smog.

The faded look to the buildings is because of – you guessed it – smog.

I don't suppose Samsung is considered a glamourous item these days.

I don’t suppose Samsung is considered a luxury
item these days.

Classical columns and giant ads front one shopping arcade.

Classical columns and giant ads front one shopping arcade.

Another interesting side note on consumption was that we were given two opportunities for buying knock-offs, another product for which China is known.

I liked the graphics on this window.  We were inside this shopping centre because someone in our group had discovered that the washrooms were really nice!

I liked the graphics on this window. We were inside this shopping centre because someone in our group had discovered that the washrooms were really nice!

Warning: selfie below…

I have never understood the fascination with high end purses...

I have never understood the fascination with high end purses…

Next Chinese post: more from Chongqing’s high-end shopping district.

Final of Fengdu, China

While looking for background for some later posts, I found this web page on Fengdu which I think is a better reference than in an earlier post.

 

In an earlier post I commented on the neat flower displays that didn’t seem to get vandalized. However, Fengdu was generally dirty and scruffy. The incense container being used as an ashtray (below) is in contrast to those I saw in other sacred sites. And Chinese people smoke a lot.

In keeping with the run down theme.

In keeping with the run-down theme.

Some parts of the Ghost City were rather run down. But the blue was eye-catching.

Some parts of the Ghost City were rather decrepit.
But the blue was eye-catching.

A colourful corner.

A colourful corner.

Fellow tourists on Sinorama Bus 2 may find themselves in this picture:

To the right of this line of people was the diorama about souls in hell.

To the right of this line of people was the diorama about souls in hell.

Once we left the main site, we walked through vendors, and I was taken by this family preparing fruit, especially the smile on the boy’s face.

One member of this family has had enough for one day!

One member of this family has had enough for one day!

I thought these were rather cute and considered buying one for my 5 year old granddaughter, but didn't think they would make it home undamaged.

I thought these were rather cute and considered buying one for my 5 year old granddaughter, but didn’t think they would make it home undamaged.

The English in this one is right, for a change!

The English in this one is right, for a change!

Next posts: Toronto, Canada

Little Boats

The Yangtze River is an important waterway for commerce of all magnitude, from one-person fishing craft to huge barges and fair-sized cruise ships.

In this post are a selection of small boats.  Well, the first one isn’t actually a boat!

Not a boat, but a marker buoy!

A marker buoy!

A hard life on dirty water.

A hard life on dirty water.

On our second day of the cruise we transferred to smaller tour boats to visit the higher reaches of some of the gorges which you can see here.  These two photos show details from our smaller tour boat.

A boatsman repairs a rope.

A boatsman repairs a rope.

Our tour boat's bumper.

Our tour boat’s bumper.

While we were on the tour up-gorge, there were numerous other smallish boats, including ones containing only Chinese tourists.

We did a double take on the fellow at the prow of the boat. Mao Tse-Tung come back to life?

We did a double take on the fellow at the prow of the boat. Mao Tse-Tung come back to life?

When we returned to the mooring of the cruise ship we were met by a friendly mobile shrimp vendor. Judging by the colour and content of the water in the Yangtze, it would not have been my choice for a healthy lunch.

Lunch!  Fresh right here!

Lunch! Fresh right here!

A couple of the Chinese passengers with us did buy these tiny shrimp.

A couple of the Chinese passengers with us did buy these tiny shrimp.

Next post: bigger boats – probably more properly termed ships.

When Pigs Fly – Street Photography in Shanghai

When Pigs Fly

When Pigs Fly   (Taken from the bus…)

Taken earlier in the day outside the Shanghai Museum while waiting for our bus.

Stricken with Pixie dust?

Stricken with Pixie dust?

I have no recollection of what part of Shanghai these next pictures are from. It was very crowded and full of interesting small stores with fairly pushy vendors.  I do know I bought two delightful pictures of very young children feeding each other with chopsticks.  The pictures are now framed and in my dining room.

We were turned loose in a crowd.

We were turned loose in a crowd.

Lovebirds' selfie.

Lovebirds’ selfie.   And Starbucks.

Where are we?

Where are we?

At some point we went to a more modern shopping area in Shanghai, the Nanjing Road, which was closed to motor vehicles (welcome relief from Chinese traffic.)   There were small trolleys, each with about three cars, which shuttled people back and forth along Nanjing Road for a small fee. We were near a huge glass-fronted Apple store when we watched a fight break out between a woman who fell (or was pushed) off a trolley, and the driver.  The woman threw the first punch and was joined by two of her female friends; the poor guy was taking quite a beating – and he didn’t fight back.  A security person called the police.  We left when they showed up. It took a lot of will power not to snap pictures. And so I have none of Nanjing Road…

 

These last three photos were taken from the bus as it returned from supper to our hotel.  The building below looks like something from the Arts and Crafts movement in England at the end of the 19th century but the window is dated 1998.

The window is dated 1998.  A beautiful facade to a well proportioned building.

 A beautiful facade to a well proportioned building.

The streets are ready for October 1, and the celebrations for the founding of the PRC.

The streets are ready for October 1, and the celebrations for the founding of the PRC.

Inside and outside on a busy Shanghai street.

Inside and outside on a busy Shanghai street.

Next post: Goodbye Shanghai:  more views of the Huangpu river (and smog)

I am wandering off to San Francisco to visit the grand-triplets (yup, three of them) but have some posts ready to go.  If I can publish them from my iPad, there will still be posts every couple of days.  If not, see you in early March.