Manhattan Monday 49

New York City - How to sparkle up a chain link fence.

New York City – How to sparkle up a chain link fence.

These photos were taken in and around New York University and Washington Square Park.

Notice the similarity in the men’s body language!

New York City - a fountain in Washington Square park.

New York City – a fountain in Washington Square park.

This is Fiorello LaGuardia, who stood only five foot two inches tall. He was New York City’s mayor from 1934-1945.

Fiorello LaGuardia

Fiorello LaGuardia

With these photos I have run out of posts on Manhattan – for now. I do have a few of Brooklyn to post on subsequent Mondays.

Manhattan Monday 45 – Library Forecourt

Main entrance, NYC main library.

Main entrance, NYC main library.

 

New York Public Library outdoor reading area.

New York Public Library outdoor reading area.

New York Public Library sitting area.

New York Public Library sitting area.

More about the Stephen A Swartzman building can be found here.

Earlier blog posts about the library can be found here and in the posts just before and after.

Manhattan Monday 40 – Historic Seaport

The South Street Seaport  (and here for Wikipedia) is a going concern in Manhattan where Fulton Street meets the East River.  It  includes Pier 17 and buildings around and landward of it. It appears from the website link that it will look very different by 2017.  I must visit again!

South Street Seaport Museum

South Street Seaport Museum

In 2014 there was a museum, some nautical craftwork and a ship, the name of which I did not note. We tend to be walking tourists rather than gawking tourists so we didn’t go into the museum.

South Street Seaport Museum buildings

South Street Seaport Museum buildings

The sign reads: "WORK IN PROGRESS - Figurehead for the ...." and the rest seems to have been rubbed out!

The sign reads: “WORK IN PROGRESS – Figurehead for the ….” and the rest seems to have been rubbed out!

A ship in need of a figurehead?

A ship in need of a figurehead?

On the riverside itself, near the ferry terminal, was this service, positively reinforcing the idea of carrying your own water bottle.

East River water station.

East River water station.

Manhattan Monday 34 – From France, with love

New York City - The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island

New York City – The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island

Strictly speaking, this isn’t Manhattan. But we got on a Hop-On-Hop-Off ferry cruise at Pier 11 near Wall Street in Manhattan and got off the ferry cruise near West 38th Street in  Manhattan, so I’m calling it Manhattan.  (There was no hopping or plopping off anywhere except the termini.)

The only way to get to Liberty Island (formerly Bedloe’s Island) is by using the Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island Ferry system. Private vessels are not allowed to dock at Liberty and Ellis Islands. We cruised by and had a lovely view of all the tourists waiting in line.

That sailboat is almost as tall as the Statue of Liberty!

That sailboat is almost as tall as the Statue of Liberty!

Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi was the sculptor of Liberty Enlightening the World (the original name) which was built by Gustave Eiffel. (He of the tower.)  It was a gift to the United States from the people of France and dedicated on October 28, 1886. So it will be 130 this year.

Who blew out the torch?

Who blew out the torch?

Manhattan Monday 25 – Chinatown 4

New York City - entrance to Chinatown from he top of a tour bus.

New York City – entrance to Chinatown from the top of a tour bus.

This statue of Lin Zexu is in Chatham Square, where 8 streets meet. Lin Zexu was not given much attention until well into the twentieth century, but is now seen as a National hero for Chinese people; no fewer than three films have been made on his role in the Opium Wars; and he is now one of the symbols of modern China’s resistance to European imperialism.

New York City - Chinatown as seen from the elevated off ramp from the Manhattan Bridge.

New York City – Chinatown as seen from the elevated offramp from the Manhattan Bridge.

These photos, from June 2015, were taken from the top of a hop-on hop-off bus tour of Brooklyn. The tour left from Foley Square in Manhattan – at least I think that’s right – it took us long enough to find it on the day! The first photo was before we reached the Manhattan Bridge, the second as we were coming off the bridge on the way back.

I now have a dilemma. Whether to show shots of Brooklyn on Manhattan Monday, because Brooklyn is not in Manhattan. Maybe Brooklyn can wait.

Wat Na Phramen, Ayutthaya Thailand

Main Buddha Image at Wat Na Phramen.

Main Buddha Image at Wat Na Phramen.

Main Buddha Image at Wat Na Phramen.

Main Buddha Image at Wat Na Phramen.

Seated Buddha Image in the style of the Dvaravati culture. Quite unusual seated position (in what is often called the European way of sitting).

Seated Buddha Image in the style of the Dvaravati culture. Quite unusual seated position (in what is often called the European way of sitting).

Under the seated Buddha, these offerings.

Under the seated Buddha, these offerings.

Following from my earlier posts about Ayutthaya, here, and here, we journeyed a short distance (about 10 minutes away) to Wat Na Phramen, where I took these photos. Thank goodness for internet search engines and for metadata on the photos – which told me there was a half hour break between shooting – or I would have no idea where these were taken.

Near these Buddhist statues was a small but beautifully decorated building, which I couldn’t find in the photos on the linked page.

After Ayutthaya-1-5

After Ayutthaya-1-6

Pigeons are everywhere in the world…

After Ayutthaya-1-7

And lastly, a many-headed Buddha and a very large bell in a building where we were able to get out of the sun.

After Ayutthaya-1-8

Ayutthaya, Thailand

Wat Mahathat

Wat Mahathat – the context

Wat Mahathat

Wat Mahathat – details

In November of 2012 we spent three weeks in Thailand. At the time, my son, daughter-in-law, and their two children were living in Bangkok while my son was country manager for Right to Play (about which more in later posts.)

While there, we made a day trip by bus, arranged by my Thai-speaking DiL,  to the King’s Summer Palace (Bang Pa-In Royal Palace), on to Ayutthaya, and the reclining Buddha, with a return boat ride – including lunch – down the Chao Phraya river to Bangkok.

Founded c. 1350, Ayutthaya became the second Siamese capital after Sukhothai. It was destroyed by the Burmese in the 18th century. Its remains, characterized by the prang (reliquary towers) and gigantic monasteries, give an idea of its past splendour. (This is a short summary from the Unesco World Heritage site: if you want to know more, Google it!)

Our tour probably included some explanations and descriptions but it was far too hot and sticky to stand in one place.  When I have a camera in my hand, my attention span for long descriptions disappears.  So I have no idea where I was on the site when I took the photos, and therefore don’t know which Wat is which.

Here are two views of the same set of towers, from two different angles.

Ayutthaya-1

Not Ozymandias.

 

 

Ayutthaya-1-4

 

And here are some details from one of the temples.

Ayutthaya-1-6

 

Ayutthaya-1-5

For another take on Ayutthaya, check out Notes from Camelid Country who is also showcasing a trip to Thailand in recent posts.

I’ll have some more photos from Ayutthaya in the next post, followed by more of this day trip and more of Thailand.

Architecture in B+W

Buddhist Shrine, Chiang Mai, Thailand - November 2012

Buddhist Shrine, Chiang Mai, Thailand – November 2012

This is the last of five consecutive posts (well, six, if you count the one on Scale) of Black and White photos in response to a challenge by Ben Rowe of Aperture64.

With this, I am challenging these five bloggers to each post five days of black and white photos.

Felicia Noordman – she who also shoots with a Pentax K20D.

Nooortje Russell of Russels Lof who often makes me laugh even though I can’t read Dutch.

Janet Rimmington at Rose Bay Letters who lives in a neighbouring province in Canada.

Jim Holroyd of Tbilisi who sometimes posts in Black and White.

Avard Woolaver who lives closer to me than any other photographer blogger whom I follow and who often posts photos that look to be black and white, but aren’t.

Remember, no pressure, you do not need to take up the challenge; in fact you may already have been challenged by someone else. I will understand if you do not, but I would love to see what you might come up with.