Manhattan Monday 34 – From France, with love

New York City - The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island

New York City – The Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island

Strictly speaking, this isn’t Manhattan. But we got on a Hop-On-Hop-Off ferry cruise at Pier 11 near Wall Street in Manhattan and got off the ferry cruise near West 38th Street in  Manhattan, so I’m calling it Manhattan.  (There was no hopping or plopping off anywhere except the termini.)

The only way to get to Liberty Island (formerly Bedloe’s Island) is by using the Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island Ferry system. Private vessels are not allowed to dock at Liberty and Ellis Islands. We cruised by and had a lovely view of all the tourists waiting in line.

That sailboat is almost as tall as the Statue of Liberty!

That sailboat is almost as tall as the Statue of Liberty!

Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi was the sculptor of Liberty Enlightening the World (the original name) which was built by Gustave Eiffel. (He of the tower.)  It was a gift to the United States from the people of France and dedicated on October 28, 1886. So it will be 130 this year.

Who blew out the torch?

Who blew out the torch?

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Manhattan Monday 33 – Not a bridge

There are other bridges to Manhattan Island including the George Washington bridge over the Hudson River at the northern end of Manhattan.  I wasn’t near enough to get any photos of it.

The other way to cross the Hudson, as I’ve done sitting in a Martz Trailways bus from Delaware Water Gap, is through the Lincoln Tunnel. Well, gee, how do you get a photo of a tunnel? You don’t. But you can get a picture of the concept of a tunnel – one that carries huge amounts of traffic every day, and has a reputation.

 

Waiting to get into the Lincoln Tunnel.

Waiting to get into the Lincoln Tunnel.

You can see the reflection of the bus windows across the sign – but the windows were amazingly clean!

I hope your internet is faster than the Lincoln Tunnel. Mine is not; that’s why I appreciate the sign so much. We don’t have Verizon in Canada.

Manhattan Monday 31 – Manhattan Bridge

Empire State Building NYC June 2013

Empire State Building NYC June 2013

The bridge in the photo above is the Manhattan Bridge, the middle of three (Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg: BMW) bridges spanning the East River.

Last week I showed the Brooklyn Bridge, but forgot to mention that it had been completed in 1883;  of course Wikipedia can provide more information if you’re curious.

These three shots of the Manhattan bridge, opened in 1909, were taken from the East River ferry as we approached the bridge and passed under it. In the first, the Brooklyn bridge is in the background.

 

Manhattan Bridge

New York City – Manhattan Bridge

Under the Manhattan Bridge on the East River Ferry

Under the Manhattan Bridge on the East River Ferry

 

Under the bridge on the East River Ferry.

Under the bridge on the East River Ferry. New York City Sony RX100M3

And this final photo was taken in June of 2015:

Manhattan Bridge from the roof of a tour bus.

Manhattan Bridge from the roof of a tour bus.

Manhattan Monday 29 – Harlem 4

At the end of this June’s visit to New York City, and at the end of our walk through Harlem, we went down Frederick Douglass Blvd, (which becomes Central Park West at the Park) stopped for a snack, and took the subway at Cathedral Parkway and 110th Street West back to collect our bags at our hotel.

It was good of the owners to protect unaware tourists and drunks from running into these flower ‘baskets.’

Frederick Douglass Blvd, Harlem NYC

Frederick Douglass Blvd, Harlem NYC

Frederick Douglass Blvd, Harlem NYC

Frederick Douglass Blvd, Harlem NYC

Also good to know where you are if you’re a tired tourist.

Frederick Douglass Blvd, Harlem NYC

Frederick Douglass Blvd, Harlem NYC

And very good to find a subway station at the end of a long morning.

Written on the subway walls...

Written on the subway walls…

Manhattan Monday will be taking a break until January.

Canada Underfoot in Manhattan

One of the nicest walks we took when in New York City this past June, was along the Hudson River.  The Hudson River Greenway runs all the way along the western edge of Manhattan: we walked from 84th Street to about 57th street. At 84th you can get under the Henry Hudson highway, and before 57th it is very hard to figure out how to get back across the highway. (We had to ask.)  For most of our walk pedestrians and bicycles shared the same path, with pedestrians clinging to the outside edges as fit commuters pedalled north after work.

New York City, Manhattan Waterfront Greenway

New York City, Manhattan Waterfront Greenway

Shortly after this section and beyond the rusting dock (note the CANADA geese) there were some interesting art installations (to come in a later Manhattan Monday post) and words carved into the walkway.

Saskatchewan Valley Canada - New York City

Saskatchewan Valley Canada – New York City

At this point the bicycles were on a different path so I wasn’t taking my life into my hands to get these photos.

Canadian Pacific Railway- New York City

Canadian Pacific Railway – New York City

I believe a rail line from Albany New York terminated near here. I can only surmise – because googling got me nowhere – that the trains owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway (Canadian Pacific Railroad is an error) brought grain from at least two of Canada’s prairie provinces (Manitoba and Saskatchewan) perhaps to be shipped overseas from docks along the river.

Manitoba, Canada - New York City

Manitoba, Canada – New York City

This is my submission to WordPress’s weekly photo challenge Beneath Your Feet.

Hong Kong Victoria Peak

Turned loose in Hong Kong, we first headed for the subway to the waterfront in Kowloon, took a Star Ferry (in a subsequent post) across the harbour to Hong Kong, and climbed the steep Hong Kong streets to the entrance of the tram which takes you to the top of Victoria Peak.

You emerge in a touristy building….from which you can see down the mountain.

View from inside the inverted pyramid at the end of the funicular railway.

View from inside the inverted pyramid at the end of the funicular railway.

You can ride escalators to the top of the building – if you have paid the extra fee to do so. We didn’t.

Those who paid for a better view, get it.

Those who paid for a better view, get it.

Alternatively you can walk around a path just below the peak and look across to Kowloon, down on the densely populated business centre of the north-facing part of Hong Kong Island, or westwards to the shipping lanes.

Looking over built up Hong Kong towards Kowloon and the New Territories.

Looking over built up Hong Kong towards Kowloon and the New Territories.

Looking over built up Hong Kong towards Kowloon and the New Territories.

Looking over built up Hong Kong towards Kowloon and the New Territories.

That must be one expensive piece of real estate!

That must be one expensive piece of real estate!

From the west side of Victoria Peak was another shopping area and viewing platforms towards the west, where it was quite hazy over the China Sea.

From the west side of Victoria Peak was another shopping area and viewing platforms towards the west, where it was quite hazy over the China Sea.

Next Hong Kong Post: the Star Ferries.

Hong Kong – Hotel Views

At last I have come to the last destination on my 21 day tour of China. Hong Kong was less smoggy than anywhere else we had been, though there was a haze as the day heated up.

The hotel as seen from a lovely park which we crossed on our way to the subway station.

The hotel as seen from a lovely park which we crossed on our way to the subway station.

We stayed at l’Hotel Nina et Convention Centre in the New Territories, not on Hong Kong Island, nor in Kowloon, which lies between the New Territories and Hong Kong Island. Our fellow tour-ists also stayed there and ate breakfast there, but we were free to tour Hong Kong on our own time and according to our own tastes.

The hotel consisted of two towers, with a bridge at the 51st floor. I think we were either just below or just above that floor.

The hotel consisted of two towers, with a bridge at the 51st floor. I think we were either just below or just above that floor.

Half way up the rise to our room, we had to change elevators – somewhere around the 44th floor. The elevator lobby at that height looked westward and southwest towards sea lanes and shipping. Most of the following photos were taken out of windows so you will see reflections in some of the corners.

Looking west towards Lantau Island and HK airport.

Looking west towards Lantau Island and HK airport.

The land to the right of the bridge is called Tsing Yi

The land to the right of the bridge is called Tsing Yi

Looking southwest past Gin Drinkers' Bay and towards Rambler Channel. (Don't you believe everything on Google Maps?)

Looking southwest past Gin Drinkers’ Bay and towards Rambler Channel. (Don’t you believe everything on Google Maps?)

This photo was taken at ground level while walking to the subway and it shows another section of the highway which appears in the lower left of the two previous photos.

This photo was taken at ground level while walking to the subway and it shows another section of the highway which appears in the lower left of the two previous photos.

From the same elevator lobby you could also see south towards a densely populated city where building was going on everywhere.

The building on the left is the same one as on the right of  the second photo

The building on the left is the same one as on the right of the second photo

From our room we could see south and eastwards towards the mountains of the New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

Looking down, you could see the hotel’s amenities, but we never went!

Expensive real estate for a pool and tennis courts.

Expensive real estate for a pool and tennis courts.

This dining table seats at least 25. We breakfast buffet clients didn’t get to sit there!

Longer than my house is wide!

Longer than my house is wide!

Next Hong Kong post: Victoria Peak