Monochrome Macau

Here’s a selection of photos from Macau which, I thought, looked better in monochrome.  The better to show off the smog in the first two photos.

 

In the waters around Macau

In the waters around Macau

Another view from Mont Forte

Another view from Monte Fort

On Fort Monte with a view of Grand Lisboa Casino and Hotel in the northern half of Macau,

On Monte Fort with a view of the Grand Lisboa Casino and Hotel in the northern half of Macau.

 

The facade of St. Paul's with those lovely striped stairs resulting from the Black and White conversion.

The facade of St. Paul’s with those lovely striped stairs resulting from the Black and White conversion.

Senado square.

Senado square.

My partner and I decided to forego the temptation of the casinos in Taipa, and the swimming pool at the hotel, and walk into the commercial centre of Taipa. At the pharmacy below we finally found aspirin, which we had been unable to figure out how to buy since Shanghai! It wasn’t quite dark, but it was smoggy and the buildings were tall so the lights are already on. The boys??? Well, make up your own mind.

In the 'city' of Taipa in the northern half of the island which makes up the bottom half of Macau.

In the ‘city’ of Taipa in the northern half of the island which makes up the bottom half of Macau.

Buddhist Macau

Macau 2013

Not far from the Christian centre of Macau was this charming neighbourhood Buddhist temple.

You could buy incense to burn ranging from tiny sparkler-sized to huge cones.

Macau 2013

Macau 2013

Macau 2013

The star attraction however was a special bowl. If you rubbed your hands firmly on the handles the water in the bowl would seem to boil. These two photos feature some of my traveling companions and one very amazed other lady.

Macau 2013

Macau 2013

I rather preferred the little shrine between the sidewalk and the busy road which I hadn’t noticed when we arrived.

Macau 2013

Next Chinese post: Las Vegas of the Orient

Chen Corridors

A simply framed bit of garden.

A simply framed bit of garden.

Inside the Chen Ancestral temple corridors criss-crossed the space and surrounded an interior courtyard. At the back was a sculpture garden. The various rooms contained museum artifacts and art (next post.)

See the drinks dispenser at the end of the corridor?

See the drinks dispenser at the end of the corridor?

See the drinks dispenser at the end of the corridor?

Ruining the look of the back garden (and I don't mean the neighbours!)

Ruining the look of the back garden (and I don’t mean the neighbours!)

Hemmed in on all sides.

Hemmed in on all sides.

Also in the back garden, this charming sculpture:

This statue is modern

This statue is modern.

The walkway was never devoid of people, but by now the weeklong celebration of the founding of the People’s Republic was over and there were fewer local tourists.

A walkway around the interior courtyard.

A walkway around the interior courtyard.

A walkway around the interior courtyard.

A walkway around the interior courtyard.

When preparing this post, I was surprised that I hadn’t taken photos of bicycles for several days. To remedy that, I offer this.

 

A back corridor.

A back corridor.

Next Chinese Post: Art from the Chen Family Ancestral Hall.

Yangshuo Market

Walking to lunch. Hot and hungry.

Walking to lunch in Yangshuo. Hot and hungry.

 

After our Li River cruise, Li villages tour and lunch, we were taken to Yangshuo’s street market. It was mid-day and very hot. A number of people – the smart people – found somewhere cool to sit and drink beer or coffee or something cool. I took photos.

A very busy street. It was along here that some of our number were taken to a shop featuring brand name knock offs.

A very busy street. It was along here that some of our number were taken to a shop featuring brand name knock offs.

Yangshuo style.

Yangshuo style.

These are two of my favourite street photos from the entire trip.

Up an alley full of hostels.

Up an alley full of hostels.

An alley of hostels and bars.

An alley of hostels and bars.

Next China post: more Yangshuo street photography.

Yangshuo Street Photography

This woman was so tired and couldn't keep her eyes open, yet she had to look after the baby. I felt sorry for her, but wasn't in the market for knives!

This woman was so tired and couldn’t keep her eyes open, yet she had to look after the baby. I felt sorry for her, but wasn’t in the market for knives!

The same photo in Black and White, which I prefer.

Guilin

Another sleepy vendor.

Another sleepy vendor.

They say that street photography gets easier over time. Not wanting to be too obvious about shooting people, I tried a few from the hip. This one is the only one I liked.

Shot from the hip.

Shot from the hip.

At last, we headed out of the heat and back to our hotel for Chinese massages before the evening light show. No photos of the massages!

Leaving the market, anxious to get out of the heat.

Leaving the market, anxious to get out of the heat.

Just outside the market, mid afternoon, so no food customers.

Just outside the market, mid afternoon, so no customers.

Li River – Tourism

Waiting for the next tour group.

Waiting for the next tour group.

Taking foreign and Chinese tourists on the lovely River Li is a booming business for the town of Yangshuo and the neighbouring city of Guilin; the name of Guilin is probably more familiar to westerners than Yangshuo. Our boat was bigger (and uglier) than the colourful boats pictured here. There were about 40 of us (a combination of buses 2 and 3 from the Sinorama 21-day tours) so the smaller boats would not have been big enough.

Looking back towards the village of Yangshuo.

Looking back towards the village of Yangshuo.

Chinese tourists always waved at us.

Chinese tourists always waved at us.

A private boat, and photographer.

A private boat, and photographer.

Some boats put in to shop at vendors on the riverside. Ours did not!

Some boats put in to shop at vendors on the riverside. Ours did not!

People Rule!

As part of a tour of China, where the People’s Republic has a hand in the itinerary, we tourists get taken to People’s monuments. In Chongqing we were dropped off in People’s Square just in front of the Hall of the People.

I believe you had to pay to get in. Not part of the tour....

I believe you had to pay to get in. Not part of the tour….

Across the Square is the Three Gorges Museum – visible behind the arch –  which was not part of our visit. But we wandered up and down the plaza…turned loose with very little explanation other than the time we were to return to the bus.

Wet, but the rain had stopped. An immense plaza .

Wet, but the rain had stopped. An immense plaza looking down from the Hall.

The plaza looking towards the Hall of the People.

The plaza looking back towards the Hall of the People.

And an even longer view of the plaza.

Mom, in her heels, can’t keep up!

The chap in the yellow shirt was our wonderful tour guide.

The chap with the yellow jacket around his waist was our wonderful tour guide.

No idea who this is or what it represents. No English translation.

No idea who this is or what it represents. No English translation.