Quebec City and Levis

For our visit to Quebec City, we stayed in Levis and rode the ferry. The only photos I took in Levis were the night time ones of Quebec across the water.

This is what Levis looks like from the Quebec Citadel, and from the ferry…

Quebec City September

Quebec City September

Quebec City September

And here are a few last shots from Quebec City…

Presbytere St-Dominique is at 175 Grande Allée Ouest just around the corner from the Quebec Museum of Art

Quebec City September

Quebec City September

These are details of  buildings in the heart of the city; very Art Deco.

A sign seems to have been removed from the first one…

Quebec City September

The Quebec flag flies prominently and proudly over this portal.

Quebec City September

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Quebec City Street Photography

It would be great if your boss didn’t yell at you about your work from across the street.
Quebec City September

It’s always nice to have something to frame a photo:
Quebec City September

It sometimes works to include your travel companion in a picture:
Quebec City September

Sometimes photos look better in black and white. (There was a coloured one of the same location in a previous post.)
Quebec City September

On “Rue du Tresor” – Treasure street, where all the artists gather to sell their works.
Quebec City September

Everyone needs a nap now and then. This huge bandshell is on the Plains of Abraham near the Quebec Museum of Art.
Quebec City September

Oh what fun it is to ride in a one-horse open caleche.
Quebec City September

Colour or black and white? On “Under the Fort Street” taken from inside Sous le Fort restaurant.

Quebec City September

Quebec City September

 

 

Also taken through the restaurant window.
Quebec City September

Quebec City Art

Two huge frescoes can be found on the side of buildings in Quebec City.  This one is on the way between the lower and upper city.

Fresque des Québécois At the corner of côte de la Montagne and rue Notre-Dame in Place-Royale, this 420 square-meter trompe-l'oeil highlights the city's 400-year history. The Fresque des Québécois also pays tribute to some 15 historical characters as well as dozens of authors and artists.

Fresque des Québécois
At the corner of côte de la Montagne and rue Notre-Dame in Place-Royale, this 420 square-meter trompe-l’oeil highlights the city’s 400-year history.
The Fresque des Québécois also pays tribute to some 15 historical characters as well as dozens of authors and artists.

All during this year, 2014, Prince Edward Island, where I live, has been celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the Charlottetown Conference. At it, in September 1864, the foundation was laid for what was to become Canada in 1867. The September conference was followed by another in Quebec City in November. The two gentlemen from the right side of the fresco which also appear in the photo below are dressed in the clothing of 1864.

Two of the Fathers of Confederation.

Two of the Fathers of Confederation.

A few more artistic details: a painting hanging outside, house signs on the walls, and a quote from inside Sous Le Fort restaurant.

Seen on a random street outside a shop.  Looking more closely, I think perhaps the sign was covering a hole in the wall!

Seen on a random street outside a shop. Looking more closely, I think perhaps the sign was covering a hole in the wall!

Quebec City September

Quebec City September

On the wall at the restaurant "Sous le Fort"

On the wall at the restaurant “Sous le Fort”

Translation: A good wine is like a kiss, neither should ever be refused.

Quebec City Sculpture

Just after debarking from the ferry from Levis, we came across this sculptural approach to participatory art. It was part of an exhibition called “Les Passages Insolites” which means unexpected or surprising paths or directions. The installation below is called “Pousse une souche” or ‘push a stump’ and is by a consortium of four artists.

That's me on the right!

That’s me on the right!

Very popular with all ages.

Very popular with all ages.

Another amusing piece from Passages Insolites was found at the bottom of Little Champlain Street and called The Odyssey.(L’odyssee)

In a small park between Little Champlain Street and Champlain Boulevard.

In a small park between Little Champlain Street and Champlain Boulevard.

As might be expected in a city heavily controlled and influenced by the Roman Catholic Church, there are many examples of religious art in Quebec City.

Bishop Saint Francis-Xavier de Montmorency-Laval, but I'd be guessing.  He appears in my previous post on statues.

Bishop Saint Francis-Xavier de Montmorency-Laval, but I’d be guessing. He appears in my previous post on statues.

On the wall of Notre Dame Basilica is this bas relief at the foot of rue de Tresor (Treasure Street.)   I was standing in the door of an ice cream and coffee shop trying to catch both the sculpture and people as they crossed the street; limited success on the latter.

Quebec City September

In front of Quebec City’s city hall were several installations including this group of three plinths.

Monument to the Teaching Priests Dedicated to the contribution of the eleven (11) priest communities who spent their lives teaching, this monument is located at the corner of Pierre-Olivier-Chauveau and Sainte-Anne Streets, in Old Québec.

Monument to the Teaching Priests
Dedicated to the contribution of the eleven (11) priest communities who spent their lives teaching, this monument is located at the corner of Pierre-Olivier-Chauveau and Sainte-Anne Streets, in Old Québec.

A charming fountain (you can just see the water trickling down the middle) stands at the corner of Grande Allee and Cartier Avenue in a tiny park.

Quebec City September

Quebec City Statues

Samuel de Champlain

Samuel de Champlain

The founder of new France, Champlain made his first visit to North America in 1603 and is considered the founder of Quebec (city) where he established a fortified “Habitation” in the summer of 1608.  The crane in the background was removing materials from the roof of the Chateau Frontenac, which has recently undergone massive renovations.

 

Francois de Montmorency de Laval, the first bishop of the Québec diocese, stands atop this monument next to the Louis-Saint-Laurent (a former Canadian Prime Minister from Quebec)  building, at the top of Côte de la Montagne and facing Buade Street.  I took the second picture to record the threatening sky.  It didn’t rain until much later in the afternoon.

François de Montmorency de Laval

François de Montmorency de Laval

François de Montmorency de Laval

François de Montmorency de Laval

The Jean-Paul Lemieux Monument is on côte de la Montagne, by the Breakneck Stairs and is a tribute to the contribution made to the arts by this famous painter.   His portrait, when much older, is the one on the upper left on the outside of the Musee national des beaux-arts du Quebec (Quebec national museum of  art)  The museum is featuring four Quebec artists this fall: Lemieux, Alfred Pellan, Fernand Leduc and Jean-Paul Riopelle .  If you go to the linked site, the work of the first three artists flashes by on the home page. We went into the building but because we wanted lunch, went right out the other side; the eating area was way too classy and expensive for what we were looking for.

Jean Paul Lemieux

Jean Paul Lemieux

Quebec Art Museum - advertising the most famous Quebec painters.

Quebec Art Museum – advertising the most famous modern
Quebec painters.

A while back I posted some pictures of statues of poets which we found on rue D’Auteuil.  Nguyen Trai was a Vietnamese scholar, poet and political tactician.

Nguyen Truc

Nguyen Truc

Next Quebec Post: Sculptures and Art