Atop the Empire State Building

Bryant Park, looking north from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

Bryant Park, looking north from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

The WordPress Photo Challenge for the week is “atop.” To see more ‘takes’ on the theme, click on the link.

These pictures were taken from the observation deck of the Empire State Building in mid-June, 2013.

Looking northwest at the fantastic detail in some of the older Manhattan buildings.

Looking northwest at the fantastic detail in some of the older Manhattan buildings.

Looking down and west from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

Looking down and west from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

Looking further west from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

Looking further west from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

The Flatiron Building, looking southwest from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

The Flatiron Building, looking southwest from the Empire State Building NYC June 2013

Some other photos from the top of the Empire State Building were used to show the bridges of Manhattan here.

 

 

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Transfogrify, transmogrify

The word smog is in the middle of transmogrify and fog could be considered as clean smog. And fog sure does change the landscape.

On Friday, as we drove from PEI to Halifax, we ran into lots of fog, including this, on the Tantramar Marsh along the border between the provinces of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia and between the towns of Sackville, NB, and Amherst, NS. It has been several years since we drove that way to Halifax and the windmills were new to me.

Windmills on the Tantramar Marsh

Windmills on the Tantramar Marsh


Taken with an iPhone 6 through the window of a moving car (I was not driving!) and edited in Apple Photos and a ‘Process’ filter added.

This week the theme of the weekly WordPress photo challenge is transmogrify. Transform. Morph. Change. Participants will show something already transformed, on the cusp of transformation, or that you wish you could transform. For more entries look here.

IPhriday – Low Tide

Looking south

Looking south – the shore is the part that’s reflecting (on the left,) and in front of the trees on the other side. The water is the grungy bit in the middle.  The dark parts are exposed river bed.

There was a storm surge today in Maritime Canada caused by an extreme low pressure system and the fact that we have just had a new moon – when tides are most extreme. There was extensive damage in the Bay of Fundy, but none that I’ve heard of in PEI. The high winds didn’t help.  The converse of the extra-high tide is an extra-low tide, which we noticed around supper time.

Looking North

Looking North – the shore is the part that’s reflecting on the right and the mottled part in the middle. The river is flowing on the left.

Looking North

Looking North from closer to the bridge: the shore and river are more obvious in this photo.

This post is late for the WordPress Photo Challenge of April 1 on the subject of Landscape and you can see other entries here.

Looking west

Looking west – Not so much a photo of the low tide, but you can see a gravel bar on the far side of the river and if you click on the photo to enlarge it you will notice a lone Canada Goose (we think it’s injured) in the river current.

This post is also for the iPhriday challenge begun by Gray Days and Coffee. You can look for other iPhriday participants by searching for the category or the tags.  The three wide photos were taken on an iPhone 6 using Hueless and edited in Lightroom on an iMac and the fourth was taken with the iPhone Camera.

 

Green Paint and Orange Dirt

Vernon Bridge Wharf under wraps

Vernon Bridge wharf under wraps

In Vernon Bridge there is a small shellfishery off a small wharf.  The wharf  is lifted out every winter and put back every spring. Over the winter, the deck of the wharf is stored on a bit of land which juts out to the left of where the wharf is in the next picture.

Two boats, Vernon River at Vernon Bridge, Split Toning, October 2014

Two boats, Vernon River at Vernon Bridge, Split Toning, October 2014. (Not vibrant)

For some reason, this winter the wharf is draped in heavy plastic splashed with vivid green paint. The orange is from rust on the wharf and from PEI soil, which is red/orange, from the iron oxide in the soil.

I hope you enjoy these vibrant abstracts – which also include (dead) mussels and other small (dead) sea creatures – as much as I enjoyed photographing them.

Vernon Bridge Wharf under wraps

Vernon Bridge wharf under wraps

Vernon Bridge Wharf under wraps

Vernon Bridge wharf under wraps

My second entry for the Word Press Photo Challenge “Vibrant” – which you can visit here.

Vibrance in the Storm

Yellow! Burdock, waiting to catch my clothes come spring.

Yellow! Burdock, waiting to catch my clothes come spring.

Yesterday I posted Black and White pictures from the start of a heavy wet snowfall.

While I was out in the snow, I also shot some vibrant bits that caught my eye.

Persistent apples that turn from yellow to orange as the winter progresses.

Persistent apples that turn from yellow to orange as the winter progresses.

It must have been warmer under the pines because the snow there was melting.

Green! It must have been warmer under the pines because the snow there was melting.

Tomato cage with leftover orange hemp support twine.

Pink! Tomato cage with leftover orange hemp support twine.

Rose hips on Rosa rubra

Orange! Rose hips on Rosa rubra

Rose hips on a shrub rose that reverted to its rootstock. I think it's an invasive and I'm debating on digging it up.

Red and Black. Rose hips on a shrub rose that reverted to its rootstock. I think it’s an invasive and I’m debating on digging it up.

And finally, our out buildings which are more vibrant when you aren’t looking at them through heavy snow!

Our Indian Red outbuildings with blue trim.

Our Indian Red outbuildings with blue trim.

To see how vibrant things are for other WordPress bloggers participating in this week’s photo challenge, have a look here.

 

All photos taken with a Pentax K3 and a Tamron 28-200 mm lens – several at 200 mm which is a 300 mm equivalent on the Pentax crop sensor. One of the reasons I shoot with the Pentax is that it is weatherproof.

Alphabet less Q V Z

Carter's Steam Fair, Hammersmith

Carter’s Steam Fair, Hammersmith

This clean, happy, cheerful, neighbourhood-sized steam fair was near our 2011 London digs.

Quite unlike anything I’d ever seen in Canada and the signage was wonderfully old-fashioned.

The photo with the carousel includes every letter of the alphabet except Q, V ,and Z.  W, in William, is hiding in the shadows below a drawing of one of the William kings.

Carter's Steam Fair, Hammersmith

Carter’s Steam Fair, Hammersmith

If you want to see what other people do with an alphabet photo challenge, check out WordPress here.

Fog ‘n Feather

Wouldn’t that make a good name for a pub?

Fog:

March 10, 2015: Everything was frosty and as it warmed up the frozen fog drifted across the river.

Frosty Morn Vernon Bridge

Frosty Morn Vernon Bridge

Feather:

There’s a sad story behind this.

February 16, 2015, in the midst of a blizzard, one of our resident bald eagles was lunching on a hapless and rapidly more featherless Canada Goose. The feathers blew three quarters of the way around the house: eastwards in the backyard, southerly along the side and then westerly across the front. This feather lodged on the rose bush (Blanche Double de Coubert if you are really keen) until early summer. Photo taken through a dirty blizzardy window. You can also see it in the lower right corner of wider angle shot.  (Those little dark spheres are from the crab apple just off scene, stage left.)

Mid-February Blizzard Goose Feather

Mid-February Blizzard
Goose Feather

 

Mid-February Blizzard - View out the front window.

Mid-February Blizzard – View out the front window.

Posted, a week late, for the WordPress photo challenge Weight(less) and you can see more entries here.