Plymouth Portrait

When I was 5 or 6, (in 1953 or 1954,) my parents got their first car. I don’t think it was new, but it might have been. Our next-door neighbours had a Ford; my father had purchased a Dodge. I hopped into the passenger seat, picked out the letters on the dash and said: “D-O-D-G-E – Ford.” I’ve never really been into cars.

All week in Havana I was on the lookout for an early 1950’s Dodge. This is the closest I got. Plymouths were “in” in Cuba, Dodges were not.

Cuba Day 3 - Central Havana Street Photography

Cuba Day 3 – Central Havana Street Photography

 A Plymouth of the right shape and beautifully painted.

A Plymouth of the right shape and beautifully painted. But not a Dodge.

Cuba Day 3 - Plymouth interior

Cuba Day 3 – Plymouth interior

I’m 68 and when taking a closer look at the photo below I just realized where this car model got its name. The sculpture on the tail light is of a ship; landing in Plymouth, Mass, USA. I’m Canadian; that’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it.

Cuba Day 3 - Around the back.....

Cuba Day 3 – Around the back…..

Cuba Day 3 - Aha, this is why it was sitting on the street!

Cuba Day 3 – Aha, this is why it was sitting on the street!

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Orange you glad you live in Prince Edward Island?

Finding a batch of orange photos for this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge was easy.  I keyword my photos in Lightroom, including the keyword for the dominant colour, if there is one, not to mention that orange was one of the categories in the 2014 PEI Photography Club show.  You can find more responses to the WP Photo Challenge here.   The challenge asked for a gallery of shots –   my first!   So as not to get carried away, these photos are limited to ones shot in my home province of Prince Edward Island, Canada.

iPad Thai

Weekly photo challenge: Extra, extra

Wat Phra That Doi Suthep, Chiang Mai, Thailand, November 2012

Wat Phra That Doi Suthep, Chiang Mai, Thailand, November 2012

 

Extra, Extra!  This photo would be a mere snapshot without the colour of the iPad cover.   I entered it in the category ORANGE in our local photo show where people who looked closely ‘got it’ but where it wasn’t special enough to win a prize.

Hutongs 1

In Beijing, hutongs are alleys formed by lines of siheyuan, traditional courtyard residences.  The number of Beijing hutongs has dropped dramatically since the 1950’s as they were demolished to make way for new roads and taller buildings. More recently, some hutongs have been designated as protected areas in an attempt to preserve this aspect of Chinese cultural history. (Wikipedia)

Where we entered this set of hutongs. There were cars parked here but only scooters, bicycles and motorcycles in the narrow lanes.

Where we entered this set of hutongs. There were cars parked here but only scooters, bicycles and motorcycles in the narrow lanes.

One attraction of the hutongs is also that they are at a human scale, whereas the 22 storey condo or apartment buildings throughout the rest of China are not.  Hence, a visit to a hutong is a must for a Chinese tour and a visit to a brand new apartment tower is not.

Small industry among the houses.

Small industry among the houses.

Bicycle portrait #1

Bicycle portrait #1

Bicycle portrait #2.  Nice that the bike colour matches the pipes on the wall.

Bicycle portrait #2. Nice that the bike colour matches the pipes on the wall.

Some homes are now bed and breakfasts.  We had a tour of one (not this one) and got to ask the owner questions, but I did not take photos inside.

Some homes are now bed and breakfasts. We had a tour of one (not this one) and got to ask the owner questions, but I did not take photos inside.

In the commercial area at the edge of a canal, a cotton candy vendor. Another colour/B&W comparison shot.

In the commercial area at the edge of a canal, a cotton candy vendor. Another colour/B&W comparison shot.

Hutong 1-2478-2

 

Next post: Shopping and glamour in the Hutongs