Ice

When water reaches a temperature below 0 degrees Celsius (32 Fahrenheit) it changes to ice.

The temperature last week was up and down like a yoyo.

Heavy rain (at 17C) left 10 cm of water in this tub. Two days later the top 5 cm froze.

Wanting to photograph the bubbles and the embedded leaves, I dumped the ice out.


Pictures taken with iPhone 6 and edited in Snapseed and Marksta.
For this week’s WordPress photo challenge Transition.

The iPhone WordPress editor is letting me down….

Halifax Public Gardens

One last rose.

One last rose.

Looking west.

Looking west.

In the heart of downtown Halifax are the Public Gardens. Even at the end of October they were lovely; a nice place to sit and relax or enjoy what remained of the flowers and foliage.

Looking east.

Looking east.

A nice place to take your kindergarten kids for a walk even if they are dressed in their Hallowe’en costumes:

Hallowe'en Public Gardens

I waited for several minutes for the seagull to turn around and face me. It didn’t. I’m a very impatient photographer.

Live action on the fountain.

Live action on the fountain.

Time zones do not equal time zones!

Time zones do not equal time zones!

More background on Halifax here.

Halifax in Black & White

More photos from our waterfront walk in Halifax, Nova Scotia,  in October/November 2014.

Building boom.

Building boom.

Empty docks.

Empty docks.

We thought these lamps had been damaged in a storm, until upon closer scrutiny, it appeared that they are supposed to look this way.  I would love to see what they look like at night, and what the one lying on the ground is lighting.

Fishing from the dock of the harbour.

Fishing from the dock of the harbour.

This time of year almost all the boat/ship traffic is over, except the Dartmouth ferries and one or two more cruise ships that were due in the first week of November.

Under repair.

Under repair.

The sidewalk art, and the crow, were near Pier 21.

Halifax Autumn

Friendly crow.

Friendly crow.

Next Post: Halifax Public Gardens

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Self portrait with new coat and shopping bag from Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC)

Self portrait with new coat and shopping bag from Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC)

Halifax is the largest city in Atlantic Canada and the largest city east of Quebec City. The urban population is about 300,000, including the city of Dartmouth which it swallowed some time ago, and the metropolitan area (which is huge) is about 400,000. The Wikipedia entry on Halifax provides an excellent overview of the city’s history, and some overview shots, which I did not take.

Halifax is a major economic centre with a large concentration of government services and private sector companies. Major employers and economic generators include the Department of National Defence, Dalhousie University (and five other major ones) the Halifax Shipyard, various levels of government, and the Port of Halifax. The harbour has always been the key feature of Halifax.

George's Island with Dartmouth oil refinery in the background.

George’s Island with Dartmouth oil refinery in the background.

George's Island and Dartmouth reflected in the water frontage of NS Power's headquarters.

George’s Island and Dartmouth reflected in the water frontage of NS Power’s headquarters.

We try to get to Halifax about once a year, usually in the fall, but sometimes for the Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo held for eight days including the July 1, Canada Day, holiday. These photos are from a visit on Hallowe’en weekend in 2014. On the day we arrived we walked along the waterfront.

Many of the piers in downtown Halifax have been converted: to a cruise ship terminal, a farmers’ market, part of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, galleries and Pier 21. Pier 21 is a museum and genealogical centre based on the immigration of one million people to Canada through the port of Halifax between 1928 and 1971. Currently it is closed for renovation (as is its web site!) so I offer you another Wikipedia reference. I discovered this year old statue of The Emigrant, standing where the one of Samuel Cunard used to be. (Samuel has been moved further north….)

The Emigrant - a statue recognizing Halifax's role in welcoming people from many lands to Canada.

The Emigrant – a statue recognizing Halifax’s role in welcoming people from many lands to Canada.

Around the harbour.

Around the harbour.

More downtown and harbour photos – black and white – in the next post.

Confederation Trail – Hazelbrook Junk

VW Heaven

VW Heaven

My photo club had an outing to a junkyard last Saturday but it had snowed and I hadn’t installed my snow tires yet, so I didn’t go. On a walk two days ago along the new Hazelbrook section of the Confederation Trail, I made up for it!

VW Heaven and friend

VW Heaven and friend

The trail runs very close to the Trans Canada Highway. On PEI very little of that highway has limited access, so there are farms and houses and businesses between the highway and the trail. From the road, you would never know what lies behind. The dirty little secret is out…

 

Another wrecked car.

Another wrecked car.

Driven off the TCH and never recovered?

Driven off the TCH and never recovered?

In a sea of grey, the blue chair stood out.

Not all the garbage has been picked up!

Not all the garbage has been picked up!

Confederation Trail – Hazelbrook PEI

Recently razed.

Recently razed.

Prince Edward Island (PEI) joined the confederation of Canada in 1873 in large part because its government was nearly bankrupt from the costs of building the PEI Railway, begun in 1871.

The railway network closed at the end of December 1989 and now, 25 years later, most of that network has been converted to a trail. The main trail is part of the Trans Canada Trail and parts of the trail are included in the International Appalachian Trail .

A second piece history is being celebrated in 2014: the 150th anniversary of the Charlottetown Conference.  It led, in 1867, to the Confederation of Canada, but, ironically, PEI did not join.  Extensive work on the trail network, called the Confederation Trail (what else?) has taken place as part of the anniversary, and several new sections have opened near where I live.

This section is near the community of Hazelbrook.  The brook is poorly defined where it runs next to the trail, and ditches don’t seem to be draining into it or anything else.  It also seems that the construction crews were in a hurry.  Sediment dams look useless:

 

Water, water everywhere.

 
Offending branches were lobbed off indiscriminately:

Slash and clear was the order of the day.

Slash and clear was the order of the day.

and leftover culverts (of which many were needed) lay in fields near the last remaining autumn colour.

A reminder that this part of the trail has only just opened and there are leftovers from the construction.

A reminder that this part of the trail has only just opened and there are leftovers from the construction.

There wasn’t much other colour remaining in November except a few berries and some hardy greens. Many of the scenes that caught my eye were in or near water.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Trailside ditches.

Trailside ditches.

Maybe 50 feet off the trail was what seemed to be the main watercourse, the Hazel Brook (which flows into Mill Creek and thus into Pownal Bay.)   We had a torrent of rain the previous day which accounts for the colour of the water and the height of the pond.

Still life with muddy water.

Still life with muddy water.

Just off the trail, a muddy series of ponds.

Just off the trail, a muddy series of ponds.

 

More of what I saw on the Hazelbrook section of the Confederation Trail will be in the next post.