The Peninsula

Hong Kong 2013

The Peninsula is the sine qua non of ex-pat luxury. A few of my tour-ist colleagues had tea or coffee there. Like taking tea at the Empress in Victoria BC, or drinks at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore.

The inside was cool (air conditioning!) and elegant. There was even a string (quartet? quintet?) playing on the mezzanine level for the pleasure of guests in the lobby, coffee shop, and reception.

Reception and lobby, The Peninsula Hotel.

Reception and lobby, The Peninsula Hotel.

Lobby of The Peninsula Hotel in Kowloon where guests were taking their morning coffee.

Lobby of The Peninsula Hotel in Kowloon where guests were taking their morning coffee.

Outside was a clean, fascinating fountain, which helped you feel cooler than the weather allowed.

Hong Kong 2013

Next door was this statue of 1881 Heritage.

I had to look this up as I was preparing the post. I thought it was just a showy advertisement for a horse jumping competition, but it is the entrance to a compound of Victorian era buildings called 1881 Heritage which include the Peninsula but also shows some of the Marine Police history (pirates!) and it includes a shopping area (of course!)

The little girl is having fun.

The little girl is having fun.

Next (and last) few Chinese posts: urban Hong Kong and some street photography

Hong Kong – Hotel Views

At last I have come to the last destination on my 21 day tour of China. Hong Kong was less smoggy than anywhere else we had been, though there was a haze as the day heated up.

The hotel as seen from a lovely park which we crossed on our way to the subway station.

The hotel as seen from a lovely park which we crossed on our way to the subway station.

We stayed at l’Hotel Nina et Convention Centre in the New Territories, not on Hong Kong Island, nor in Kowloon, which lies between the New Territories and Hong Kong Island. Our fellow tour-ists also stayed there and ate breakfast there, but we were free to tour Hong Kong on our own time and according to our own tastes.

The hotel consisted of two towers, with a bridge at the 51st floor. I think we were either just below or just above that floor.

The hotel consisted of two towers, with a bridge at the 51st floor. I think we were either just below or just above that floor.

Half way up the rise to our room, we had to change elevators – somewhere around the 44th floor. The elevator lobby at that height looked westward and southwest towards sea lanes and shipping. Most of the following photos were taken out of windows so you will see reflections in some of the corners.

Looking west towards Lantau Island and HK airport.

Looking west towards Lantau Island and HK airport.

The land to the right of the bridge is called Tsing Yi

The land to the right of the bridge is called Tsing Yi

Looking southwest past Gin Drinkers' Bay and towards Rambler Channel. (Don't you believe everything on Google Maps?)

Looking southwest past Gin Drinkers’ Bay and towards Rambler Channel. (Don’t you believe everything on Google Maps?)

This photo was taken at ground level while walking to the subway and it shows another section of the highway which appears in the lower left of the two previous photos.

This photo was taken at ground level while walking to the subway and it shows another section of the highway which appears in the lower left of the two previous photos.

From the same elevator lobby you could also see south towards a densely populated city where building was going on everywhere.

The building on the left is the same one as on the right of  the second photo

The building on the left is the same one as on the right of the second photo

From our room we could see south and eastwards towards the mountains of the New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

Looking down, you could see the hotel’s amenities, but we never went!

Expensive real estate for a pool and tennis courts.

Expensive real estate for a pool and tennis courts.

This dining table seats at least 25. We breakfast buffet clients didn’t get to sit there!

Longer than my house is wide!

Longer than my house is wide!

Next Hong Kong post: Victoria Peak

Watery Hotel

Lijiang Hotel, Guilin

Lijiang Hotel, Guilin

No, the ceiling did not leak, and there was no moat around the front, but somewhere in this hotel was a mega-sized water pump.

Every night the Lijiang Waterfall Hotel holds a light and water show off its back side. After the Impressions of Sanjie Liu show the previous night in Yangshuo it seemed pretty ho-hum, but the engineering was impressive.

Left:

Neon and Water-9948

Right:

Neon and Water-9953

Centre:

Neon and Water-9959

 

The neon lights in the area were also interesting.  This first shot was taken outside the restaurant where we ate supper (not in the hotel.)  I like the fact that it was an ART store, and it was the the typo created by the burned out light  that caught my eye.  I really like the composition and the colours.

Neon and Water-9941

Behind and beside the hotel:

 

Behind and beside the hotel.

The facade of the hotel: the stripes changed colour every few seconds.

The stripes gradually changed colour every few seconds.

The stripes gradually changed colour every few seconds.

Only twice did I try to shoot the interior of a hotel, and the other time it didn’t work!

Neon and Water-9969

Neon and Water-9970

Neon and Water-9971

Next Chinese post, we move on to Guangzhou

Li River Karst Hills

 

Yangshuo near Guilin China

 

Early one morning,

just as the sun was rising,

we took a bu-us to

the  lovely River Li.

And they're off....

And they’re off….

 

 

Standing at the bow.

Standing at the bow.

 

Smog or haze?

Smog or haze?

Back story:  The previous day our tour group had debarked from its cruise on the Yangtze, visited pandas at the zoo, People’s Square, and a shopping precinct before flying  from Chongqing to Guilin and taking a 90 minute bus ride from Guilin to Yangshuo.  This made for a very long day which made some of us very cranky (not me!)  We spent the night in Yangshuo in a typical tourist hotel. The hotels pictured below are on the other side of the street from ours, with cones of Karst behind them.

 

The tourist hotel strip.

The tourist hotel strip.

 

It was quite hazy and/or smoggy on the river and the distant Karst hills were quite faint. I’ve used Lightroom to add contrast and vibrance to the river scenes.

Next Chinese posts: The Li River and Yangshuo