Drumheller Scenes

Spring comes three or four weeks earlier to Drumheller, Alberta, than it does to my home in Prince Edward Island.  And I can’t grow either of these plants: Pulsatilla (one of my plants lasted one winter) or Anemone. My cousin had them in his garden on May 6, 2016.

One of my rules of photography is: always carry the wrong camera lens when going out for a walk. With a 24-70mm lens, this was all I could get of the skittish deer who who stayed well away from us.

Drumheller, Alberta

Find the two mule deer!

I suspect that the concrete blocks on the decommissioned bridge are partly there to prevent the bridge from floating away in a flood. But they also serve to discourage walkers and prevent cyclists from using the bridge as part of a rail trail.  Something to do with liability – which should really be sorted out to the benefit of residents and tourists. We walked the trail on the east side – which is where we saw the deer.

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Below: another wildlife sighting.  Sitting on an island in the Red Deer River was an osprey (hiding behind the twigs on the right.)  I was actually taking a picture of the recent rock fall on the upper left, which is distinguished by the fresher bands of orange.

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

An interesting rock!

Drumheller, Alberta

A close up of the interesting rock. Drumheller, Alberta

This is the last of my posts from Drumheller!

Star Mine Suspension Bridge

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

This is the view looking west northwest up the Red River, from the middle of the Star Mine suspension bridge.  Calm, and promising a hot, clear day.

One of the few remaining bits of evidence of the existence of the mine is this structure sitting at the top of one of the low hills.

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

The photo below tells the short history of the bridge – which was used to transport men and coal from a mine on the other side of the valley to the rail lines on the other.

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

The bridge itself was fun to cross.  The photo below is on the mine side; the sign asks you not to swing the bridge and to keep the load below 20 people.

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Dinosaurs in the Royal Tyrrell Museum

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

When you enter the display space of the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller Alberta you find dioramas of dinosaurs like those above.

Deeper into the museum we found this display, which explains where and how fossil remains are found – any how ancient creatures are named.

Jim is my second cousin, and he also arranged a tour for us through the labs behind the scenes.  Thanks Jim!

Drumheller Hoodoos

Drumheller, Alberta: A classic view.

Drumheller, Alberta: A classic view.

The Hoodoos of Drumheller Alberta are worth a visit. A small but impressive collection is to be found near East Coulee in the valley of the Red River southeast of the town. The best section is surrounded by walkways and managed by the Province of Alberta.

The landscape looks like this:

The landscape around the protected Hoodoos in Drumheller, Alberta

Around the protected Hoodoos in Drumheller, Alberta

And up close the rock looks like this:

Drumheller, Alberta: Alberta got very little moisture over the 2015-16 winter and it shows.

Drumheller, Alberta: Alberta got very little moisture over the 2015-16 winter and it shows.

These wannabe Hoodoos are just outside the protected showpiece Hoodoos but illustrate how a harder rock on top of a softer one can eventually result in the formations in the first picture.

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

Drumheller, Alberta

You can find more about Hoodoos here.  And more about East Coulee/Drumheller Hoodoos here.

Photos taken mid-day. That’s my excuse and I’m sticking to it!

iPhriday – Drumheller Alberta

Badlands - Drumheller near the Red Deer River.

Badlands – Drumheller near the Red Deer River.

In early May we flew to Calgary, Alberta, rented a car, and drove through parts of Alberta and British Columbia to Vancouver where we dropped off the car.  Our first stop was Drumheller;  the Red Deer River has created a stunning landscape through its valley. Drumheller is also the location of the Royal Tyrrell Museum. Our ‘tour guide’ in Drumheller was my second cousin who recently retired after 34 years at the Museum. One of the places he took us, downriver from the town, was the Star Mine Suspension Bridge on a calm sunny morning.

Red Deer River from Star Mine Suspension Bridge, Drumheller, Alberta

Red Deer River from Star Mine Suspension Bridge, Drumheller, Alberta

After we left Drumheller we drove most of the day but stopped for lunch in Red Deer where the town had organized a fund-raising barbecue for Fort McMurray (Alberta) which was experiencing a devastating fire causing all of its 88,000 residents to become disaster refugees.  (The fire started on May 1; this was May 6, and the fire was still out of control.) This article from MACLEAN’s Magazine, published May 12,  is long but has some stunning photos and graphics to show the extent of the disaster.  Residents were only able to return to Fort Mac starting about 10 days ago.

Fort McMurray fundraiser.

Fort McMurray fundraiser.

While I usually took pictures with my Pentax K5 or my Sony R100/3 I made a point of getting a couple of iPhone photos every day – so I could post to Facebook. I expect to post more photos of this trip soon!

iPhriday begun by Gray Days and Coffee blogger. See other posts here.