Community Theatre Festival: La chasse galerie

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Every year, ACT (a community theatre) co-ordinates the PEI Community Theatre Festival, held in March near or on World Theatre Day. As an active ACT member, for the third year in a row I was asked to photograph the 2016  event. This is the second of several Thursday Theatre postings.

The local French school, Ecole Francois-Buote. put on a classic French-Canadian legend about a group of lumberjacks who go to see loved ones on Christmas Eve. The devil intervenes.

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

Ecole Francois Buote

 

Between ensuring my camera settings were working in the stage lighting (it was the first play) and the speed at which some of the children spoke I completely missed the storyline. But at the end the lumberjacks all got up and paddled their canoe back home!

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Mi’kmaq Legends on Stage

Mi'kmaq Legends: Rabbit

Mi’kmaq Legends: Rabbit

The Mi’kmaq Heritage Actors staged several legends as part of their appearance at the 2016 PEI Community Theatre Festival. Through story, song, and dance they provided a taste of the colourful heritage of the native people of Abegweit. (Abegweit is the Mi’kmaq name of Prince Edward Island.)

One of the legends was “Rabbit” (above)

Another of the stories was “Dancing Boy” where a son tries to learn skills from his father.

Mi'kmaq Legends: Dancing Boy

Mi’kmaq Legends: Dancing Boy

Mi'kmaq Legends: Dancing Boy

Mi’kmaq Legends: Dancing Boy

Mi'kmaq Legends: Dancing Boy

Mi’kmaq Legends: Dancing Boy

I’m not sure which legends these photos belong with, but they are among my favourite shots from their presentation.

Mi'kmaq Legends

Mi’kmaq Legends

Mi'kmaq Legends

Mi’kmaq Legends

Mi'kmaq Legends

Mi’kmaq Legends

This is the fourth in a series of six Theatre Thursdays about the plays staged at the PEI Community Theatre Festival.

Dear March, Part II

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Every year, ACT (a community theatre) co-ordinates the PEI Community Theatre Festival, held in March on or near World Theatre Day.  As an active ACT member, for the third year in a row I was asked to photograph the event. This is the second of several Theatre Thursday postings.

Rag-Tag Players are part of the Murphy Community Centre’s programming for youngsters which gets kids not just to act material, but to create it.   They created and performed “Dear March…” at the 2016 PEI Community Theatre Festival.  It was charming, colourful and the kids were delightful.

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

There were three parts to their show: a dramatized version of Emily Dickinson’s Dear March (no photos); a mini-play (last Thursday’s post) and The Dance of the Fairy Choosing (today’s photos.)   March, from last week’s post, is on the right of the photo below.

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Also submitted for this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge: Dance.

 

Connected to Hamlet

Hamlet, played by T. Noah J. Nazim in Scene 4 of ACT's production of Hamlet.

Hamlet, played by T. Noah J. Nazim in Scene 4 of ACT’s production of Hamlet.

Hamlet has one more show in its run –  tomorrow, Labour Day, at 4pm in Cotton Park in Stratford PEI. Parking is off MacDonald Road.

One of the elements which makes theatre exciting is watching the dynamics between actors. How they connect – physically, with eye contact and emotionally – adds greatly to the quality of a performance.

How they connect with the audience can depend on the venue, and in ACT (a community theatre)’s current performance, is aided by playing most scenes in the round.

Scene 1, the Danish Court arrives.

Scene 1, the Danish Court arrives.

Scene 2: Polonius delivers his famous speech to son Laertes while sister Ophelia smirks in the background.

Scene 2: Polonius delivers his famous speech to son Laertes while sister Ophelia smirks in the background.

Scene 3: the ghost of Hamlet's father

Scene 3: the ghost of Hamlet’s father (played by the same actor who plays Claudius, Hamlet’s uncle)

Scene 4: Gertrude, Hamlet's mother, and his uncle, Claudius, consult on whether Hamlet is mad - or not.

Scene 4: Gertrude, Hamlet’s mother, and his uncle, Claudius, consult on whether Hamlet is mad – or not.

Scene 5: Ophelia tries to return Hamlet's letter (also the "to be or not to be" scene)

Scene 5: Ophelia tries to return Hamlet’s letter (also the “to be or not to be” scene)

Scene 6 - the play within the play.

Scene 6 – the play within the play.

Scene 7 - The ghost reappears to Hamlet (after he has killed Polonius by mistake) to remind him of his blunted purpose.

Scene 7 – The ghost reappears to Hamlet (after he has killed Polonius by mistake) to remind him of his blunted purpose.

Scene 8 - In which we know that Ophelia has gone mad over the death of her father and Hamlet's rejection of her.

Scene 8 – In which we know that Ophelia has gone mad over the death of her father and Hamlet’s rejection of her.

Scene 9 - Claudius and Laertes conspire to kill Hamlet.

Scene 9 – Claudius and Laertes conspire to kill Hamlet.

Scene 10 - The gravedigger sings while Hamlet and Horatio (played by a woman in our show) look on with amusement, not knowing yet whose grave it is.

Scene 10 – The gravedigger sings while Hamlet and Horatio (played by a woman in our show) look on with amusement, not knowing yet whose grave it is.

Scene 11 - Lady Osric brings a message to Hamlet. The actress playing Lady Osric also plays Gravedigger One, Guildenstern and the Player Queen.)

Scene 11 – Lady Osric brings a message to Hamlet. The actress playing Lady Osric also plays Gravedigger One, Guildenstern and the Player Queen.)

Scene 11 - Hamlet offers Claudius the poisoned cup and makes him drink it.

Scene 11 Hamlet offers Claudius the poisoned cup and makes him drink it.

Click on the photos for larger versions.

Also posted for WordPress’s photo challenge: Connected.

Theatre is Ephemeral

The choir sings at the wedding in Act II of Thornton Wilder's Our Town.  Production by ACT (a community theatre)

The choir sings at the wedding in Act II of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town. Production by ACT (a community theatre)

Unlike studio-recorded music, or movies or visual art, theatre and live performances are ephemeral. There may be many hours of practice and work before the event, but once the performance is over, it cannot be recaptured. Sure you can take photos, as I’ve done here of a half-dressed rehearsal, or make a video or audio record, but it is not the same as the actual performance. Part of it has to do with the presence of a live audience and their response.

Mrs. Soames (the character) thinks it is the most beautiful wedding she has ever seen.

Mrs. Soames (the character) thinks it is the most beautiful wedding she has ever seen.

As Emily realizes in Act III of Our Town, it is the everyday activities of our everyday lives that are ephemeral. And we should be paying more attention to them.

Emily and George kiss in Act Two of Our Town while the choir, family (in the front row by the choir) and friends look on.

Emily and George kiss in Act II of Our Town while the choir, family (in the front row by the choir) and friends look on.

For other interpretations of the ephemeral theme, check this out!

Like I said in my previous post, I’m up to my ears in community theatre. In addition to being the show photographer, I’ve been property master for Our Town, ACT (a community theatre)’s 20th Anniversary production of the first show it staged in May of 1995. The play opens in 9 days. We also auditioned for Hamlet all weekend, which I’m producing this summer.

Halifax Hallowe’en

Smashed pumpkins.

Smashed pumpkins.

Yes, I know we’re well into the Christmas/Hanukkah/Solstice/Kwanzaa/Diwali season.
Which is one of the reasons I haven’t been posting. I’m trying to finish up all sorts of things prior to driving to Ontario to visit my new grandson and the rest of his family.

But I just remembered that I have shots of Halifax that I had ready to post, but didn’t.

Much of the upper part of Queen Street houses vintage clothing stores and other craft outlets and the storefronts are very colourful.

Queen Street Vintage Clothing Stores.

Queen Street Vintage Clothing Stores.

Queen Street Vintage Clothing Stores.

Queen Street Vintage Clothing Stores.

Queen Street Vintage Clothing Stores.

Queen Street Vintage Clothing Stores.

Bicycle on Doyle Street.

Bicycle on Doyle Street.

We ate very early at an empty restaurant, Morris East. Since the staff didn’t have much to do, they were gathered behind the bar which was visible in the mirror above my partner’s head.

The wait staff at Morris East during an early supper.

The wait staff at Morris East during an early supper.

Gold Cup Parade Floats

The antique fire trucks always lead the parade.

The antique fire trucks always lead the parade.

The theme of the parade was the celebration of the 1864 Charlottetown Conference. Floats reflected the theme, however tenuously. These three did better than others. The City of Charlottetown, Parks Canada, and I have no idea who the guy with the axe was with, but the float represented our primary industries.

Children are popular additions to floats.

Children are popular additions to floats.

This gentleman was particularly engaging with the crowd.

This gentleman was particularly engaging with the crowd.

This gentleman was particularly engaging with the crowd.

This gentleman was particularly engaging with the crowd.

Farming, forestry and agriculture.  I didn't figure this out during the parade.

Farming, forestry and fishing. I didn’t figure this out during the parade.

 

Corporations often participate, as do voluntary sector organizations.

Sobeys is one of the two main grocery chains in Maritime Canada.

Sobeys is one of the three main grocery chains in Maritime Canada.

The back of the Sobeys truck was full of imported fruit!  Three cheers for ONTARIO peaches.

The back of the Sobeys truck was full of imported fruit! Three cheers for ONTARIO peaches.

The Shriners participate in PEI's parade every year, usually with a huge contingent.

The Shriners participate in PEI’s parade every year, usually with a huge contingent.

Rotary International.

Rotary International.

And now, something for the kids…

To entertain the kids add: McQueen, Mater, Dora and a couple of huge balloons.

To entertain the kids add: McQueen, Mater, Dora and a couple of huge balloons.

Next : the  last Gold Cup Parade post: The RCMP