Manhattan Monday 37 – People at Work

More pictures from June 2015; these of construction and work sites seen from the top of a Hop-On, Hop-Off bus tour that began in lower Manhattan, crossed the Manhattan Bridge, and circled Brooklyn.

New York City - We were told to wave by the bus driver! The worker in the middle of the photo waves back!

New York City – We were told to wave by the bus driver! One of the workers waves back!

Pole Painting, Brooklyn

Pole Painting, Brooklyn

In the next picture you can see the Williamsburg Bridge in the background. It’s one of the bridges I didn’t cover in previous posts on New York City Bridges: the Brooklyn, Manhattan and Ed Koch/Queensboro .

Brooklyn from the elevated access to the Manhattan Bridge.

Brooklyn from the elevated access to the Manhattan Bridge.

New York City - from the elevated off ramps of the Manhattan Bridge.

New York City – from the elevated off ramps of the Manhattan Bridge.

Manhattan Monday 19 Street Life

On the way to and from the Hudson River Greenway, showcased here and here, were some street photography opportunities.

The first two shots are from the Upper West Side on the way to the Greenway. When the Google earth photos were taken of this street, the same motorcycle was parked in the same place.

West 83rd Street between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway.

West 83rd Street between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway.

West 83rd Street between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway.

West 83rd Street between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway.

 

The next two shots are from the west side somewhere around West 55th Street as we dragged our way back to our hotel, Pod 51, on East 51st Street, between 3rd and 2nd Avenue. (Yes, I would recommend the Pod Hotels.)

Between 12th and 9th Ave, somewhere around West 54th...

Between 12th and 9th Ave, somewhere around West 54th…

Between 12th and 9th Ave, somewhere around West 54th...

Between 12th and 9th Ave, somewhere around West 54th…

Manhattan Monday #10

Midtown Manhattan Conference

Midtown Manhattan Conference

It’s pretty hard to do street photography, which concentrates on people, from the top of a bus. Just when you think you have a shot lined up, the light changes and the bus moves. Or a truck moves between you and your subject. Or there’s a parked car blocking part of the shot (as with the photo below).

New York City Street  Corner in Midtown

New York City Street Corner in Midtown

Photos taken from the top of a Hop-On, Hop-Off bus in Midtown Manhattan on a very hot June day with a Sony RX100III.

Hong Kong Street Photography

All of the pictures here were taken from the Hong Kong Central and Mid-Level escalators.

Pedestrian traffic at the intersection of the escalators and a cross street.

Pedestrian traffic at the intersection of the escalators and a cross street.

In Asian cities there is no space - outside for a clothes line, or inside for a dryer. Laundry drying on a balcony is a typical sight.

In Asian cities there is no space – outside for a clothes line, or inside for a dryer. Laundry drying on a balcony is a typical sight.

The construction site on the right is protected by razor wire and construction fallout is kept from landing on the escalators by a bamboo and plastic bib.

The construction site on the right is protected by razor wire and construction fallout is kept from landing on the escalators by a bamboo and plastic bib.

A cross street that ran under the escalators/walkways.

A cross street that ran under the escalators/walkways.

Better in Black and White?

Better in Black and White?

Next Chinese post: More Hong Kong Street Photography

Hong Kong Downtown

As seen from a Star Ferry

As seen from a Star Ferry

There was extensive construction work taking place on Hong Kong’s waterfront.

Is it possible they were extending the subway line?

Booming waterfront

Booming waterfront

Any guesses as to what the machine under the tarps is doing?

Any guesses as to what the machine under the tarps is doing?

Better in Black and White.

Better in Black and White.

Walking from the ferry terminal to the heart of urban Hong Kong was a snap as there were glassed, elevated passages over the construction and street traffic. And from ours you could see into the very busy Apple store.

Efficient one way passages.

Efficient one way passages.

Apple's Everywhere

Apple’s Everywhere

Once at ground level the signage to all the tourist attractions and major buildings was excellent.

Street signs in Chinese and English.

Street signs in Chinese and English.

As you can see from the various photos, there were many buses, taxis and commercial vans, but very few private vehicles.

Buses and Taxis Rule

Buses and Taxis Rule

Next Chinese Post: More of the roads and buildings of Hong Kong.

Li River Village #2

Noodles.

Noodles!

Another rack of noodles.

Another rack of noodles.

A couple of houses in the second village were being worked upon. One of our number went a little closer to see what they were doing. I hope no one dropped bricks on the kids playing below the workers. In our country we take so many safety precautions, some of them perhaps a bit too careful, but then we don’t hear the death statistics from construction sites in China….

This is how they build houses near Yangshuo.

This is how they build houses near Yangshuo.

House props with shoes drying.

House props with shoes drying.

It was only five days after the celebration of the founding of the PRC on October 1….

Remains of a firecracker celebration. Reminded me of the Canadian flag.

Remains of a firecracker celebration. Reminded me of the Canadian flag.

Chinese Bridges

A beautiful bridge spanning one of the gorges upriver from the Yangtze.

A beautiful bridge spanning one of the gorges upriver from the Yangtze.

China has a long history in bridge construction. The oldest bridge still in existence in China is the Anji Bridge constructed during the years between 595 and 605. Everywhere you go in China you see beautiful, functional, and often very new bridges.  The Yangpu Bridge in Shanghai was featured in an earlier post.

I first began to appreciate Chinese bridge building when reading Simon Winchester’s marvellous book about Joseph Needham. called ‘The Man who Loved China.’   Needham was one of the first westerners to recognize China’s scientific and engineering discoveries, most of which preceded western science by decades or even centuries.

When we travelled up the ‘three little gorges’ we passed under a very modern bridge (above and below.)

A closer view

A closer view

Structural detail.

Structural detail.

In Wushan, where our tour of the Three Little Gorges began, was another modern structure.

Another style of bridge, again with red as a prominent design feature.

Another style of bridge, again with red as a prominent design feature.

Bridge on-ramp and tour boats.

Bridge on-ramp and tour boats.

Structural detail.

Structural detail.

Lower down the Yangtze we passed this massive structure. The scale can be appreciated when you realize that there are people in the lower right foreground!

Is this a bridge? Well the overpass behind the orange structure is a type of bridge.

Is this a bridge? Well the overpass behind the orange structure is a type of bridge.

Recently China has been constructed many record breaking bridges.
China is currently home to the Danyang–Kunshan Grand Bridge, the world’s longest bridge measuring over 164 kilometres (102 mi).
The Xihoumen Bridge bridge in Zhejiang province is the second longest suspension bridge span.
The Sutong Bridge in the Jiangsu province is the second longest cable-stayed span.
The Sidu River Bridge is the highest bridge in the world.
The Chaotianmen Bridge bridge is the longest arch bridge span.
The longest sea bridge in the world is currently under construction between Macau and Hong Kong.  

A list of China’s bridges is here.

Next post: Urban development above the Three Gorges Dam.