Wandering for two years and 300 posts

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

This is my 300th post on WordPress. I published my first on October 27, 2013, almost exactly two years ago. I started the blog to share my photos of a tour to China with my fellow travellers, and have gone on to show off Prince Edward Island, Toronto, San Francisco, and New York City  – among other destinations.

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

Who knows where the wandering will take me from here. I have a stock of digital photos from Japan, Thailand and Peru that you can expect to see in the coming year. I have a photo workshop booked in Havana for February. And I hope to start digitizing slides from earlier years.

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

Confederation Trail 19 to 23

Until then, I’m wandering paths in PEI on the Confederation Trail. (Well, not today – we had snow this morning!)

Thank you to all my followers, to those who comment on my photos,  and to those who look at my posts on Facebook. Blessed be.

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Confederation Trail – Uigg – Signs of Man

Kilometer 18

Kilometer 18

The Confederation Trail has markings every kilometre, the occasional bench or picnic table, and purple (!) gates where it crosses major roads (to keep out motorized vehicles.)

Kilometer 19

Kilometer 19

 

Confederation Trail, Uigg

 

There are signs of agricultural life everywhere.

 

Farmland and a conifer tree line.

Farmland and a conifer tree line.

It used to be common for farmers and others to dump derelict vehicles at the back of their properties. This faded red truck has never been retrieved, though there was an extensive program to recycle vehicles during the last quarter of the last century (gee it seems weird saying that!)

Red Truck.

Red Truck.

You don’t want to know what other common practice was evident in the pile on the left of this picture…at Kilometre 17.

Confederation Trail, Uigg

These apples are not a sign of agricultural life, so much as a sign of how many apples the train crews must have eaten, throwing the cores out the windows. There are wild apple trees everywhere along all parts of the Confederation Trail.

Wild apple trees abound beside the trail.

Wild apple trees abound beside the trail.

Confederation Trail – Hazelbrook Junk

VW Heaven

VW Heaven

My photo club had an outing to a junkyard last Saturday but it had snowed and I hadn’t installed my snow tires yet, so I didn’t go. On a walk two days ago along the new Hazelbrook section of the Confederation Trail, I made up for it!

VW Heaven and friend

VW Heaven and friend

The trail runs very close to the Trans Canada Highway. On PEI very little of that highway has limited access, so there are farms and houses and businesses between the highway and the trail. From the road, you would never know what lies behind. The dirty little secret is out…

 

Another wrecked car.

Another wrecked car.

Driven off the TCH and never recovered?

Driven off the TCH and never recovered?

In a sea of grey, the blue chair stood out.

Not all the garbage has been picked up!

Not all the garbage has been picked up!

Confederation Trail – Hazelbrook PEI

Recently razed.

Recently razed.

Prince Edward Island (PEI) joined the confederation of Canada in 1873 in large part because its government was nearly bankrupt from the costs of building the PEI Railway, begun in 1871.

The railway network closed at the end of December 1989 and now, 25 years later, most of that network has been converted to a trail. The main trail is part of the Trans Canada Trail and parts of the trail are included in the International Appalachian Trail .

A second piece history is being celebrated in 2014: the 150th anniversary of the Charlottetown Conference.  It led, in 1867, to the Confederation of Canada, but, ironically, PEI did not join.  Extensive work on the trail network, called the Confederation Trail (what else?) has taken place as part of the anniversary, and several new sections have opened near where I live.

This section is near the community of Hazelbrook.  The brook is poorly defined where it runs next to the trail, and ditches don’t seem to be draining into it or anything else.  It also seems that the construction crews were in a hurry.  Sediment dams look useless:

 

Water, water everywhere.

 
Offending branches were lobbed off indiscriminately:

Slash and clear was the order of the day.

Slash and clear was the order of the day.

and leftover culverts (of which many were needed) lay in fields near the last remaining autumn colour.

A reminder that this part of the trail has only just opened and there are leftovers from the construction.

A reminder that this part of the trail has only just opened and there are leftovers from the construction.

There wasn’t much other colour remaining in November except a few berries and some hardy greens. Many of the scenes that caught my eye were in or near water.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Trailside ditches.

Trailside ditches.

Maybe 50 feet off the trail was what seemed to be the main watercourse, the Hazel Brook (which flows into Mill Creek and thus into Pownal Bay.)   We had a torrent of rain the previous day which accounts for the colour of the water and the height of the pond.

Still life with muddy water.

Still life with muddy water.

Just off the trail, a muddy series of ponds.

Just off the trail, a muddy series of ponds.

 

More of what I saw on the Hazelbrook section of the Confederation Trail will be in the next post.

 

Dreamy Autumn

Vernon Bridge signs of autumn.ECMA Murphy Centre April 14, 2011

I’ve been playing around with camera motion on landscapes.  How I wish I could make my attempts with watercolour look like the first one, over a pond on the Confederation Trail near the Avondale Road. The second is from the bridge in Vernon Bridge looking southwest.  Both photos taken in the last 10 days.

In response to the weekly WordPress Photo Challenge: see other Dreamy photographs here.