Young Cuban Faces #2

Cuba Day 2 - Who are these white women with their big cameras?

Cuba Day 2 – Who are these white women with their big cameras?

It was my colleague who charmed him into the big smile.

Cuba Day 2 - Shy but charming.

Cuba Day 2 – Shy but charming.

I didn’t look for shots of children – and they were largely in school when we prowled around Central Havana. These next two shots were taken on the Sunday when we went to hear Afro-Cuban music on Callejon de Hamel.

Twins on Callejon de Hamel

Twins on Callejon de Hamel

A willing subject on Callejon de Hamel

A willing subject on Callejon de Hamel

It was fairly late in the afternoon when we walked down this street; children were home from school and playing soccer.

Duelling Cameras: another photo workshop group!

Duelling Cameras: another photo workshop group!

Young Cuban Faces

Central Havana February 2016 - Safe behind her wall.

Central Havana February 2016 – Safe behind her wall.

People throughout Havana were more than willing to have their photos taken or to have photos of their family or children taken. This post is the first in a series of people shots.

Central Havana February 2016 - Dad wasn't so sure about the photograph.

Central Havana February 2016 – Dad wasn’t so sure about the photograph.

Central Havana February 2016

Babe in arms - Central Havana February 2016

Babe in arms – Central Havana February 2016

No, mister, don't tell him to look at the camera.

No, mister, don’t tell him to look at the camera.

Somewhat older children next week…

Dear March, Part II

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Every year, ACT (a community theatre) co-ordinates the PEI Community Theatre Festival, held in March on or near World Theatre Day.  As an active ACT member, for the third year in a row I was asked to photograph the event. This is the second of several Theatre Thursday postings.

Rag-Tag Players are part of the Murphy Community Centre’s programming for youngsters which gets kids not just to act material, but to create it.   They created and performed “Dear March…” at the 2016 PEI Community Theatre Festival.  It was charming, colourful and the kids were delightful.

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

There were three parts to their show: a dramatized version of Emily Dickinson’s Dear March (no photos); a mini-play (last Thursday’s post) and The Dance of the Fairy Choosing (today’s photos.)   March, from last week’s post, is on the right of the photo below.

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Murphy Centre Kids

Also submitted for this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge: Dance.

 

Dear March…Part 1

Winter with the RagTag Players

Winter with the Rag-Tag Players

 

My long-time readers will know that I am involved in ACT (a community theatre), having produced Hamlet (2015) and Macbeth (2012) in a local park as well as photographing several shows and coordinating properties for others.

Every year, ACT (a community theatre) co-ordinates the PEI Community Theatre Festival, held in March on or near World Theatre Day.  As an active ACT member, for the third year in a row I was asked to photograph the event. This is the first of several Thursday Theatre postings.

Rag-Tag Players are part of the Murphy Community Centre’s programming for youngsters which gets kids not just to act material, but to create it.   They created and performed “Dear March…” at the 2016 PEI Community Theatre Festival.  It was charming, colourful and the kids were delightful.

There were three parts to the show: a dramatized version of Emily Dickinson’s Dear March (no photos); a mini-play (today’s photos) and a dance (next Theatre Thursday.)

When you are absorbed in getting shots of moving subjects in changing lighting it’s hard to follow the story line. But, I think March – in lavender and purple – was a little hesitant to make an appearance.

Murphy Centre Kids - March contemplates her life.

Murphy Centre Kids – March contemplates her life.

December, January and February (the ones in white) conspire to help keep her hidden.

Murphy Centre Kids: December to March

Murphy Centre Kids: December to March

The other seasons are concerned about March’s absence and try to figure out what to do.

Murphy Centre Kids - RagTag Players: summer and autumn.

Murphy Centre Kids – Rag-Tag Players: summer and autumn.

Eventually spring, summer and autumn (who are definitely the ones in orange/red) prevailed and March overcame her shyness. One of the winter characters waves her arms and stamps her feet but because I was laughing I missed the photo of her.

Murphy Centre Kids - March emerges.

Murphy Centre Kids – March emerges.

Dear March - Come in -	
How glad I am -
I hoped for you before -
Put down your Hat -	
You must have walked -
How out of Breath you are -	
Dear March, how are you, and the Rest -
Did you leave Nature well -	
Oh March, Come right upstairs with me -
I have so much to tell -

I got your Letter, and the Birds -	
The Maples never knew that you were coming -
I declare - how Red their Faces grew -	        
But March, forgive me -	
And all those Hills you left for me to Hue -	
There was no Purple suitable -	
You took it all with you -	        
  
Who knocks? That April -
Lock the Door -

Emily Dickinson1830 – 1886

People Rule!

As part of a tour of China, where the People’s Republic has a hand in the itinerary, we tourists get taken to People’s monuments. In Chongqing we were dropped off in People’s Square just in front of the Hall of the People.

I believe you had to pay to get in. Not part of the tour....

I believe you had to pay to get in. Not part of the tour….

Across the Square is the Three Gorges Museum – visible behind the arch –  which was not part of our visit. But we wandered up and down the plaza…turned loose with very little explanation other than the time we were to return to the bus.

Wet, but the rain had stopped. An immense plaza .

Wet, but the rain had stopped. An immense plaza looking down from the Hall.

The plaza looking towards the Hall of the People.

The plaza looking back towards the Hall of the People.

And an even longer view of the plaza.

Mom, in her heels, can’t keep up!

The chap in the yellow shirt was our wonderful tour guide.

The chap with the yellow jacket around his waist was our wonderful tour guide.

No idea who this is or what it represents. No English translation.

No idea who this is or what it represents. No English translation.

Humble Administrator’s Garden Details – Suzhou #3

Lotus seed head.

Lotus seed head.

This post is limited to a few photos of the details I found interesting during my exploration of the garden. And at the bottom is some trivia about Suzhou. Unfortunately all we saw of Suzhou was the garden and the bridge over the river (two posts ago.)

Pavement.

Pavement.

One of many ornate screens.

One of many ornate screens.

Bonsai.  There was also a bonsai 'nursery' in another part of the garden, but I did not get any good photos there.

Bonsai. There was also a bonsai ‘nursery’ in another part of the garden, but I did not get any good photos there.

A fellow-traveler who takes Tai Chi informed me that the instrument being played in the boat in the previous post is a Pipa. Perhaps someone knows the names of these instruments?

A concert with traditional instruments was just finishing as we approached this tea house.

A concert with traditional instruments was just finishing as we approached this tea house.

Always a delight to get a photo of a child.

Always a delight to get a photo of a child.

I would like to have one of these for my house. Too bad they are too big to carry in a suitcase.

I would like to have one of these for my house. Too bad they are too big to carry in a suitcase.

Trivia about Suzhou:

* The Suzhou Museum was designed by I.M. Pei, whose family came from Suzhou. Pei lived most of his life in the US and was a very successful architect there. Perhaps his best-known work is the glass pyramid outside the Louvre in Paris.

* Suzhou (pronounced Sue Joe) used to be anglicized to SooChow.

* A lengthy blog post by Yangzi Man about Suzhou with LOTS of pictures will give you some idea of what else you should see if you ever go to Suzhou.

Next severalposts: Shanghai

Leaving Beijing on laundry day

Sunny and no smog.  Downtown Beijing as seen from the east.

Sunny and no smog. Downtown Beijing as seen from the east.

When I awoke that morning (September 24, 2013)  there were beautiful clear views of the centre of the city.

Zoom in on the centre of Beijing as seen from the east.

Zoom in on the centre of Beijing as seen from the east.

…while down below, people played Jianzi in the parking lot.

…while down below, people played Jianzi in the parking lot.

After 30 posts, I have exhausted my stock of Beijing photos. But before we left we took a quick tour of the neighbourhood around our hotel, the Lijingwan International, just outside the ‘east 4th ring road middle’ near the Shilipu subway stop.

Between the market (previous post) and our hotel was a hardware store, colourful with plastic bowls and buckets.

Between the market (previous post) and our hotel was a hardware store, colourful with plastic bowls and buckets.

It was laundry day and the fence next to the canal (Google doesn't give it a name) was put to good use.

It was laundry day and the fence next to the canal (Google doesn’t give it a name) was put to good use.

Mother's little helper.

Mother’s little helper.

From baby buggy to heavy cart.

From baby buggy to heavy cart.

I did not stage this.  Well maybe a bit.  But the underwear was hanging inches to the right of where it is in the photo. (Our hotel is in the background.)

I did not stage this. Well maybe a bit. But the underwear was hanging inches to the right of where it is in the photo. (Our hotel is in the background.)

Farewell Beijing.  This is the traffic situation as we headed to the airport to fly to Xian where the adventure continued…

Bus 2

Bus 2

Next post: Xian at sundown.