Quebec City Statues

Samuel de Champlain

Samuel de Champlain

The founder of new France, Champlain made his first visit to North America in 1603 and is considered the founder of Quebec (city) where he established a fortified “Habitation” in the summer of 1608.  The crane in the background was removing materials from the roof of the Chateau Frontenac, which has recently undergone massive renovations.

 

Francois de Montmorency de Laval, the first bishop of the Québec diocese, stands atop this monument next to the Louis-Saint-Laurent (a former Canadian Prime Minister from Quebec)  building, at the top of Côte de la Montagne and facing Buade Street.  I took the second picture to record the threatening sky.  It didn’t rain until much later in the afternoon.

François de Montmorency de Laval

François de Montmorency de Laval

François de Montmorency de Laval

François de Montmorency de Laval

The Jean-Paul Lemieux Monument is on côte de la Montagne, by the Breakneck Stairs and is a tribute to the contribution made to the arts by this famous painter.   His portrait, when much older, is the one on the upper left on the outside of the Musee national des beaux-arts du Quebec (Quebec national museum of  art)  The museum is featuring four Quebec artists this fall: Lemieux, Alfred Pellan, Fernand Leduc and Jean-Paul Riopelle .  If you go to the linked site, the work of the first three artists flashes by on the home page. We went into the building but because we wanted lunch, went right out the other side; the eating area was way too classy and expensive for what we were looking for.

Jean Paul Lemieux

Jean Paul Lemieux

Quebec Art Museum - advertising the most famous Quebec painters.

Quebec Art Museum – advertising the most famous modern
Quebec painters.

A while back I posted some pictures of statues of poets which we found on rue D’Auteuil.  Nguyen Trai was a Vietnamese scholar, poet and political tactician.

Nguyen Truc

Nguyen Truc

Next Quebec Post: Sculptures and Art

Quebec City Streetscapes Upper Town

Quebec City September

 

All these photos were taken within the City walls.  Above is Rue St Louis and the two photos below are on Avenue St. Denis, just north of the Quebec Citadel.

Quebec City September

Quebec City September

And, after we had wandered all the way across the Plains of Abraham and back, the two photos below were (probably?) taken on Rue D’Auteuil, opposite the statues of international poets and thinkers shown in this post.

Quebec City September

Quebec City September

 

This may have been on rue St Jean, but by then I had lost my sense of direction other than knowing that downhill would eventually lead back to the ferry terminal and restaurants!

Quebec City September

As we walked by the ‘skyscraper’ building shown here, I overheard a tour guide say to his charges that the building had been modelled on the Empire State Building.  Note the Quebec flag with its Fleur de Lis on the top.

Quebec City September

Almost exactly one year before this we were in China, in Xi’an, whose flag (showing its famous bell tower which my tour DID NOT see!)  is flying on the left of the others on Quebec’s City Hall.  I can only presume that Quebec has some sort of a twinning relationship with Xi’an, Namur, Paris, Bordeaux, and Calgary.

Quebec City September

 

 

 

Quebec City Daytime

Wide angle view of Quebec City from Levis.

Wide angle view of Quebec City from Levis.

Chateau Frontenac, lower town, and the waterfront.

Chateau Frontenac, lower town, and the waterfront.

For the WordPress Photo Challenge Nighttime, I posted shots of Quebec City. This post is of landscape-type photos taken during the day.

The first photo, a wide angle shot, was taken around 9:30 am from the steps leading down to the Levis ferry terminal, on the opposite bank of the St. Lawrence River. The second, zoomed in, is of the iconic Chateau Frontenac. I heard somebody on the radio this week say that after New York City, Quebec has the most beautiful skyline. That may be a rather North Americ-centric comment, but I otherwise, I can’t disagree.

After we climbed from the old, lower town, up through the touristy walled city, (where I took lots of pictures of people and details) we turned to look north over churches and government buildings.

Looking north from the walk around the fort.

Looking north from the walk around the fort.

We then hiked around the Quebec Fortifications. Of note is that the Fortification is the home of the second battalion of the “Royal 22nd Regiment” otherwise known as the “Van Doos.”

Quebec City September

We arrived on the bluff above the St. Lawrence at the point where a direct walkway from the Chateau ends. You can see this walkway angling up along the cliff in the first photo.

The top of the walkway from Dufferin Terrace - below the Chateau - to the far side of the fort.

The top of the walkway from Dufferin Terrace – below the Chateau – up to the far side of the fort.

We then walked across the Plains of Abraham where a pivotal battle occurred in 1759 which resulted in the England’s domination of what was to become Canada. (From Wikipedia: “During the Seven years War, in 1759, the British, under the command of General James Wolfe, besieged Quebec City for three months. The city was defended by French general the Marquis de Montcalm. The very short battle of the Plains of Abraham lasted approximately 15 minutes and culminated in a British victory and the surrender of Quebec.”)

The Plains of Abraham and the city's modern hotels.

The Plains of Abraham and the city’s modern hotels.

At centre-left of the next photo, on the horizon, you can see the top of the Chateau Frontenac.

Lunch time on the Plains of Abraham.

Lunch time on the Plains of Abraham.

At the end of the day I got a shot of the lower town from the ferry.

Fortifications in the lower city, 'sous le fort.'

Fortifications in the lower city, ‘sous le fort.’

As usual when we visit a city, we walked a lot, and other than the ferry (included in our B&B) and meals, we didn’t pay for anything.
More details on Quebec City to follow in later posts.

Quebec City Nighttime

Modern hotels behind the Plains of Abraham on the left, the iconic Chateau Frontenac on the right.

Modern hotels behind the Plains of Abraham on the left, the iconic Chateau Frontenac on the right.

Last week (September 16, 2014) we visited Quebec City for a day on the way from Pennsylvania to Prince Edward Island (PEI).  We spent the day and had dinner in the city and I took pictures with my new Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III (to be blogged later.) After supper we took the ferry back to Levis, returned to our bed and breakfast, got my Pentax SLR K20D, my 18-50mm Sigma lens, and a tripod and went down to the Levis Terrace which overlooks Quebec City and the St Lawrence River. (La fleuve St Laurent)  I was determined to take better photos of nighttime Quebec than I had six years ago.

The iconic building is the Chateau Frontenac, now a Fairmont Hotel, once part of Canadian Pacific Railway hotels.

The Chateau and Dufferin Terrace are lit up as is the working waterfront.

The Chateau and Dufferin Terrace are lit up as is the working waterfront.

The “old town” lies beneath and to the east of the Chateau and Dufferin Terrace and includes working docks, restaurants, shops and to the east, industry and business.

To the east  and downriver of the city on the bluff are the lower town and business and industry, including these buildings washed with light.

To the east and downriver of the city on the bluff are the lower town and business and industry, including these buildings washed with light.

Six years ago in November we visited Quebec City for a day on the way from PEI to Ontario.  I tried to take shots of the city at night from Levis at a slightly different location.  I was using the same Pentax K20D and a 28-200 Tamron zoom – but they were handheld.  They make for interesting abstracts!

The Chateau is still the focus, just not IN focus!

The Chateau is still the focus, just not IN focus!

Quebec City 2008-2222

By this time I was playing...

By this time I was playing…

 

Travel tip:  The best way to visit Quebec City is to stay in Levis, across the river, and ride the ferry to Quebec City in the morning and take it back in the evening.  We stayed at the fantastic Au Plumard Bed and breakfast where the gourmet three-course breakfasts were amazing.  If you stay in Levis the accommodation is cheaper, you don’t have to fight traffic into and out of Quebec City, and the views from the ferry are worth the cost of the fare.