Manhattan Monday 46 – St Patrick’s Cathedral

Looking south,through the crossing.

Looking south,through the crossing.

St Patrick’s Cathedral, on Fifth Avenue at East 51st Street, was undergoing extensive interior work when we dropped in after a full day of walking in June 2015. It’s hard to get a photo these days without getting another photographer in the picture!

Looking towards the Fifth Avenue entrance (west)

Looking towards the Fifth Avenue entrance (west)

The north aisle.

The north aisle.

Windows in the north aisle and crossing.

Windows in the north aisle and crossing.

Manhattan Monday 36 – Harlem Crossing Too

 

 

Church of St Thomas the Apostle: Harlem Crossing Too

Church of St Thomas the Apostle: Harlem Crossing Too

The Church of St. Thomas the Apostle is a closed Roman Catholic parish church in New York City that has been threatened with demolition and has been the subject of a debate about the preservation of a landmark.. The church is located at 260-262 W. 118th St., at the corner of St. Nicholas Avenue, in Harlem.

We checked out the exterior which has posters saying they are open – but according to the web link above, it has been closed since 2003. It looks as though it was – and is – beautiful, but it is in need of much restoration. The picture was timed to catch this young family crossing the street.

Harlem Crossing One was last Monday but because both Crossing One and Crossing Two were scheduled I can’t provide the link. (I’m in Havana this week on a photo workshop!)

A trio of trios

Three selective windows on Great George Street, Charlottetown. Kelby Photo Walk 2015

Three reflective windows on Great George Street, Charlottetown. Kelby Photo Walk 2015

Trio of floating things around Peake's Quay in Charlottetown Harbour. Kelby Photo Walk 2015

Trio of floating barriers around Peake’s Quay in Charlottetown Harbour. Kelby Photo Walk 2015

Three steeples on St. Dustan" Basilica, Great George Street, Charlottetown. Kelby Photo Walk 2015

Three steeples on St. Dustan’s Basilica, Great George Street, Charlottetown. Kelby Photo Walk 2015

The WordPress photo challenge for this week is Trio. These trios  are from October 3, 2015, shot with my Pentax K20D and a Tamron 28-200m zoom.  Other WordPress entries can be found here.

Bang Pa-In Thai Palace

While in Thailand in November 2012, we took a tour out of Bangkok to Ayutthaya.  The tour stopped at the Summer Palace – Bang Pa-In – before reaching Ayutthaya.

Bang Pa-In

Bang Pa-In

Bang Pa-In Royal Palace, also known as the Summer Palace, lies beside the Chao Phraya River in Ayutthaya Province. In fact, either the river flows through the palace grounds, or a portion of it has been diverted to form this beautiful waterway.

Chao Praya River

Chao Praya River

You were allowed inside this building, which was like a temple, but more airy.

You were allowed inside this building, which was like a temple, but more airy.

Close up of the roof of the previous building.

Close up of the roof of the previous building.

After falling into disrepair over the previous centuries, most of the present buildings were constructed between 1872 and 1889 by King ChulalongkornWikipedia tells me that Bang Pa-In is used for banquets and special occasions, but rarely by the royal family.

The pavilion in the water was originally build entirely of wood but the base was later changed to concrete.

Thailand November 2012 Thailand November 2012

We were permitted to see the Queen’s sitting room and audience chamber, (no photos) but I had to put on a floor-length skirt in order to be admitted. (I was wearing capri-length pants.)  While donning the skirt in a side room, I saw this light fixture, which I enjoyed as much as the buildings outside.

What vintage? 1920's?

What vintage? 1920’s?

Orwell PEI Abandoned House

The drive

The drive

Next to Orwell Corner Historic Village is an abandoned house, which I know as the Stanley House. It has been empty for at least twenty years, and occasional suggestions that it might be refurbished and turned into an inn or a restaurant in association with Orwell Corner, or actually lived in, have not come to be.  I had never actually been to see it and was sorry to see its present state. (I live about 4 km from it!)

The front door.

The front door.

Detail, front doorknob.

Detail, front doorknob.

The architecture is typical of PEI farmhouses from the end of the 19th century.

The sun room, which would have had a beautiful view to the west.

The sun room, which would have had a beautiful view to the south and west.

Views through the uncurtained windows yielded surrealistic views.

Looking through the sunroom.

Looking through the sunroom.

Orwell Corner Historic Village PEI

The pantry?

The pantry?

The trees are outside, for now.

The trees are outside, for now.

Oops! The dates on the copyright notice are wrong. The photos were taken in August 2014, not 2013, but I’m too tired to go back and re-export them from Lightroom with the right watermark.

Orwell Corner Farm, PEI, Canada

The exposed red sandstone foundation of an outbuilding.

The exposed red sandstone foundation of an outbuilding.

At Orwell Corner Historic Village they keep chickens and geese.  Most of the chickens were hiding in a dark hen house.

Triplets checking out the geese.

Triplets checking out the geese.

The geese were not impressed.

The geese were not impressed.

In the barns they had sheep and lambs, and pigs.  It was too dark in the barns to shoot the sheep and pigs.

Beautiful Canadian horses, at least the darker one is.

Canadian horses, at least the darker one is.

Isn't it beautiful here?

Isn’t it beautiful here?

The boys were interested in the farm equipment.

Photographer's note; If you are repeatedly going in and out from dark buildings to bright sunshine be sure to check your exposure often.  Yes, 'chimp' or you, like I, will overexpose a few shots.

Photographer’s note; If you are repeatedly going in and out from dark buildings to bright sunshine be sure to check your exposure often. Yes, ‘chimp’ or you, like I, will overexpose a few shots.

Next PEI post: Orwell Corner school house and outside pump

Hong Kong Street Photography #2

Little Italy? in Hong Kong?

Little Italy? in Hong Kong?

These are photos of streets with people as the decoration, rather than the type of street photography which focuses on people with their urban environment as setting. Nonetheless the presence of people in the photos is what makes them interesting.

The lads in the bucket were acting up when we went by,  but this photo doesn't capture it!

The lads in the bucket were acting up when we went by, but this photo doesn’t capture it!

On the street where we looked for lunch, half way up the escalators.

On the street where we looked for lunch, half way up the escalators.

Below are a couple of colour versus black and white comparisons. The more I convert photos to black and white, the more I want to do more of it.

Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Black and white: Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Black and white: Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Hardware store with working area on the street.

Hardware store with working area on the street.

Black and white: Hardware store with working area on the street.

Black and white: Hardware store with working area on the street.

Hong Kong Harbour Light Show

Hong Kong 2013

The best place from which to watch the Hong Kong light show is in Kowloon, because it is the commercial buildings in Hong Kong which provide most of the ‘show.’

Get there early so you can find somewhere to sit, relax, enjoy people-watching and see an impressive display of lights across the harbour. It was nothing compared to Impressions of Sanjie Liu but it was a pleasant way to end the day.

Hong Kong 2013

Hong Kong 2013

Hong Kong 2013

Hong Kong 2013

Hong Kong 2013

Hong Kong 2013

Hong Kong – Hotel Views

At last I have come to the last destination on my 21 day tour of China. Hong Kong was less smoggy than anywhere else we had been, though there was a haze as the day heated up.

The hotel as seen from a lovely park which we crossed on our way to the subway station.

The hotel as seen from a lovely park which we crossed on our way to the subway station.

We stayed at l’Hotel Nina et Convention Centre in the New Territories, not on Hong Kong Island, nor in Kowloon, which lies between the New Territories and Hong Kong Island. Our fellow tour-ists also stayed there and ate breakfast there, but we were free to tour Hong Kong on our own time and according to our own tastes.

The hotel consisted of two towers, with a bridge at the 51st floor. I think we were either just below or just above that floor.

The hotel consisted of two towers, with a bridge at the 51st floor. I think we were either just below or just above that floor.

Half way up the rise to our room, we had to change elevators – somewhere around the 44th floor. The elevator lobby at that height looked westward and southwest towards sea lanes and shipping. Most of the following photos were taken out of windows so you will see reflections in some of the corners.

Looking west towards Lantau Island and HK airport.

Looking west towards Lantau Island and HK airport.

The land to the right of the bridge is called Tsing Yi

The land to the right of the bridge is called Tsing Yi

Looking southwest past Gin Drinkers' Bay and towards Rambler Channel. (Don't you believe everything on Google Maps?)

Looking southwest past Gin Drinkers’ Bay and towards Rambler Channel. (Don’t you believe everything on Google Maps?)

This photo was taken at ground level while walking to the subway and it shows another section of the highway which appears in the lower left of the two previous photos.

This photo was taken at ground level while walking to the subway and it shows another section of the highway which appears in the lower left of the two previous photos.

From the same elevator lobby you could also see south towards a densely populated city where building was going on everywhere.

The building on the left is the same one as on the right of  the second photo

The building on the left is the same one as on the right of the second photo

From our room we could see south and eastwards towards the mountains of the New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

The New Territories.

Looking down, you could see the hotel’s amenities, but we never went!

Expensive real estate for a pool and tennis courts.

Expensive real estate for a pool and tennis courts.

This dining table seats at least 25. We breakfast buffet clients didn’t get to sit there!

Longer than my house is wide!

Longer than my house is wide!

Next Hong Kong post: Victoria Peak

Macau – Street Scenes

Below St. Paul's facade

Below St. Paul’s facade

The photo above gives some idea of the tourist traffic in and around St. Paul’s facade.

The following two photos are of the narrow street leading from the remaining facade of St. Paul’s to Senado Square.

On the tourist route between St. Paul's and Senado square.

On the tourist route between St. Paul’s and Senado square.

On the tourist route between St. Paul's and Sedano square.

On the tourist route between St. Paul’s and Sedano square.

The layout of the tiles in Senado Square, in the middle of the touristy area of Macau, gave a tromp d’oeil feeling of an uneven plaza.  The ground is perfectly level but even the pictures are deceiving.  I don’t know if the phone holder is taking a ‘selfie’ or a shot of the plaza.

Senado Square

Senado Square

Senado Square

Senado Square

 

This next “street photo” was taken in Zhuhai near the Fisher Girl, similar to a photo from a couple of posts ago, except that a beggar has been added to the scene.  We did see beggars at some tourist sites, but not very many.

 

Zhuahai

Zhuahai

The following photo is an orphan, not having any relatives in any other post.  We thought the red jacket might have belonged to Mao (?)

In Coloane between our hotel and Taipa. This building may have been part of the "City of Dreams" but there didn't seem to be much life around it.

In Coloane between our hotel and Taipa. This building may have been part of the “City of Dreams” but there didn’t seem to be much life around it.

And finally, a shot of an ad for a CANADIAN English language school. It was a bit of a surprise to me to learn recently that in Prince Edward Island, Canada, where I live, the most-spoken language after English and French is Chinese. After thinking about it for a while, I’m not really surprised at all!

In the 'city' of Taipa in the northern half of the island which makes up the bottom half of Macau.

In the ‘city’ of Taipa in the northern half of the island which makes up the bottom half of Macau.