Hong Kong Street Art

Vertical

Vertical

Horizontal. Nice that the man at the desk is recycling his paper in the blue bag at his feet!

Horizontal. Nice that the man at the desk is recycling his paper in the blue bag at his feet!

I was carrying my (heavy) 28-200mm zoom (with crop sensor) on this day in Hong Kong and couldn’t get far away to do justice to the whole wall of art in one shot. There was no indication of who the artist was or signage to explain why such great work was in this place at that time.

High

High

Low.  You'd almost mistake the street light for a real one.

Low. You’d almost mistake the street light for a real one.

This last work was taken as we meandered down from the HK Zoo and Botanical Garden. At that point we were navigating by gravity – down meant the harbour and the Star Ferries and home to our hotel in Kowloon.

Hong Kong 2013

Hong Kong 2013

This is the last post in my series about China.

I intend to show off my home province, Prince Edward Island, Canada, for a while – especially the summer pictures – to perhaps entice you to vacation here some time.

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Hong Kong Street Photography #2

Little Italy? in Hong Kong?

Little Italy? in Hong Kong?

These are photos of streets with people as the decoration, rather than the type of street photography which focuses on people with their urban environment as setting. Nonetheless the presence of people in the photos is what makes them interesting.

The lads in the bucket were acting up when we went by,  but this photo doesn't capture it!

The lads in the bucket were acting up when we went by, but this photo doesn’t capture it!

On the street where we looked for lunch, half way up the escalators.

On the street where we looked for lunch, half way up the escalators.

Below are a couple of colour versus black and white comparisons. The more I convert photos to black and white, the more I want to do more of it.

Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Black and white: Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Black and white: Debris-catcher-enclosed building and vendors encroaching on the street.

Hardware store with working area on the street.

Hardware store with working area on the street.

Black and white: Hardware store with working area on the street.

Black and white: Hardware store with working area on the street.

Hong Kong Street Photography

All of the pictures here were taken from the Hong Kong Central and Mid-Level escalators.

Pedestrian traffic at the intersection of the escalators and a cross street.

Pedestrian traffic at the intersection of the escalators and a cross street.

In Asian cities there is no space - outside for a clothes line, or inside for a dryer. Laundry drying on a balcony is a typical sight.

In Asian cities there is no space – outside for a clothes line, or inside for a dryer. Laundry drying on a balcony is a typical sight.

The construction site on the right is protected by razor wire and construction fallout is kept from landing on the escalators by a bamboo and plastic bib.

The construction site on the right is protected by razor wire and construction fallout is kept from landing on the escalators by a bamboo and plastic bib.

A cross street that ran under the escalators/walkways.

A cross street that ran under the escalators/walkways.

Better in Black and White?

Better in Black and White?

Next Chinese post: More Hong Kong Street Photography

Hong Kong Central and Mid-Level

What would they do with snow?

What would they do with snow?

The central and mid-level escalators were constructed 20 years ago to allow people to commute up and down Hong Kong’s steep hills. There will be more pictures taken from on and around the escalator route in my next three Hong Kong posts.

We decided that riding the escalators would be a good way to see some of the city, but only rode them up. Finding our way down was a little more problematic and less photogenic:

 

Overhead view of the tight fit around construction zones.

Overhead view of the tight fit around construction zones.

The not-so-pretty walk back down the mountain.

The not-so-pretty walk back down the mountain .

Shortly after this underpass we found the Hong Kong Zoo and Botanic Garden, but between the low light and my urban fatigue, I didn’t take any photos!

The not-so-pretty walk back down the mountain, with partner ready-to-pose.

The not-so-pretty walk back down the mountain with partner ready-to-pose.

In a sea of modern high rises, it is the smaller, more architecturally interesting buildings that stand out.

The skyline from mid-level Hong Kong.

The skyline from mid-level Hong Kong.

Amid all the modern high rises, the Christian churches stood out.

Amid all the modern high rises, the Christian churches stood out.

Amid all the modern high rises, the Christian churches stood out.

Amid all the modern high rises, the Christian churches stood out.

Next posts: Street photography and art in mid-level Hong Kong.

Hong Kong Downtown

As seen from a Star Ferry

As seen from a Star Ferry

There was extensive construction work taking place on Hong Kong’s waterfront.

Is it possible they were extending the subway line?

Booming waterfront

Booming waterfront

Any guesses as to what the machine under the tarps is doing?

Any guesses as to what the machine under the tarps is doing?

Better in Black and White.

Better in Black and White.

Walking from the ferry terminal to the heart of urban Hong Kong was a snap as there were glassed, elevated passages over the construction and street traffic. And from ours you could see into the very busy Apple store.

Efficient one way passages.

Efficient one way passages.

Apple's Everywhere

Apple’s Everywhere

Once at ground level the signage to all the tourist attractions and major buildings was excellent.

Street signs in Chinese and English.

Street signs in Chinese and English.

As you can see from the various photos, there were many buses, taxis and commercial vans, but very few private vehicles.

Buses and Taxis Rule

Buses and Taxis Rule

Next Chinese Post: More of the roads and buildings of Hong Kong.

The Peninsula

Hong Kong 2013

The Peninsula is the sine qua non of ex-pat luxury. A few of my tour-ist colleagues had tea or coffee there. Like taking tea at the Empress in Victoria BC, or drinks at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore.

The inside was cool (air conditioning!) and elegant. There was even a string (quartet? quintet?) playing on the mezzanine level for the pleasure of guests in the lobby, coffee shop, and reception.

Reception and lobby, The Peninsula Hotel.

Reception and lobby, The Peninsula Hotel.

Lobby of The Peninsula Hotel in Kowloon where guests were taking their morning coffee.

Lobby of The Peninsula Hotel in Kowloon where guests were taking their morning coffee.

Outside was a clean, fascinating fountain, which helped you feel cooler than the weather allowed.

Hong Kong 2013

Next door was this statue of 1881 Heritage.

I had to look this up as I was preparing the post. I thought it was just a showy advertisement for a horse jumping competition, but it is the entrance to a compound of Victorian era buildings called 1881 Heritage which include the Peninsula but also shows some of the Marine Police history (pirates!) and it includes a shopping area (of course!)

The little girl is having fun.

The little girl is having fun.

Next (and last) few Chinese posts: urban Hong Kong and some street photography

Hong Kong by Night

After the harbour light show we walked back to the Metro (called, in English, MTR.)

What are you preparing for?

What are you preparing for?

Large lighted sculpture of cartoon characters. You can see how big they are by the size of the people walking around the edges  of the platform.

Large lighted sculpture of cartoon characters. You can see how big they are by the size of the people walking around the edges of the platform.

We had to walk up a major shopping street to get to the Metro…

A luxury shopping neighbourhood.

A luxury shopping neighbourhood.

In tropical and sub-tropical countries, orchids abound. But to a northerner, seeing them in flower boxes or growing wild, it seems very exotic.

Urban flower pots in a hot climate.

Urban flower pots in a hot climate.

This photo was taken before the light show as we walked back down from Victoria Peak (previous post) to get the Star Ferry (previous post) back to Kowloon.

In many cities I find the surname of my kids, and think they may appreciate a photo.

In many cities I find the surname of my kids, and think they may appreciate a photo.