Hamlet and Yorick’s Skull

Noah Nazim and Skull for PR

Noah Nazim and Skull for PR

The most common symbol associated with Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, is a skull. The lines associated with that particular scene are often misquoted; the correct quote is below.

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? Your gambols? Your songs? Your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? (Hamlet, V.i)

I’m producing Hamlet for our community theatre group, ACT (a community theatre), which will be staged on the last weekend of August and the first weekend in September. For our poster this year, the director suggested a photo of the actor playing our Hamlet, together with a skull. The photo above was taken on a cold May day. The poster was created by my talented step-daughter.
 

Hamlet Poster 2015, designed by Christina G Gaudet.

Hamlet Poster 2015, designed by Christina G Gaudet.

The photo below is from Saturday’s rehearsal. Different skull…

Hamlet Rehearsal July 11

Hamlet Rehearsal July 11

For other symbols, visit the WordPress Photo Challenge site.

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4 comments on “Hamlet and Yorick’s Skull

  1. Ah lucky you to be working on Hamlet! I made costumes for it a long time ago and just kept going to the rehearsals over and over because I love the language so much.

    It’s a long one though–are you cutting it down a bit?

    • BuntyMcC says:

      The director deleted much: all of Fortinbras and any reference to Norway, many secondary characters and chunks of dialogue. Down to 11 scenes (in 10 locations) and 8 actors playing 16 roles. Hamlet, Horatio (played by a woman), Ophelia and Gertrude as themselves, Claudius/Ghost and Polonius/Priest. One actor plays Laertes, Rosencrantz, a Player and a gravedigger; another (a woman) plays Guildenstern, Oscric, a Player and a gravedigger, only the last of those as a man. The play moves throughout the park. We have a wonderful costumer; I can’t sew more than a straight line!

  2. inesephoto says:

    love the poster! I am a local Choral Society supporter – never miss any musical. You are doing a great job!

  3. BuntyMcC says:

    Thanks. We also have done musicals, but not for 5 years. A good musical venue can be very expensive.

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