Canada Geese Taking Off

Much more photogenic when flying towards you than away.

Much more photogenic when flying towards you than away.

For five of the last six years, 3000 (plus or minus) Canada Geese have over-wintered overnight in the Vernon River next to our house. There is open water caused by the narrowing of the channel for a bridge, and by the fact that the river is still tidal at that point.

Heading east before turning north.

Heading east before turning north.

They leave in groups of anywhere from four (4) to 400 after they’ve warmed up in the morning and feed on whatever they can find left in the fields on our third (?) of the Island.

Three different departures

Three different departures.

Flying to church in Vernon River.

Flying to church in Vernon River.

They return, usually en masse, just after sunset. My en masse I mean over 2000 of them at once. A few others arrive early.

At night they gobble all night long, which is rather soothing. As they take off, land, or when an eagle flies over, they are very noisy.

All but one of the shots here were taken with a Pentax K20D and a Tamron 28-200 mm zoom at 200 (300 on a crop sensor) at 1/350 second and f 9.5. The one of the misguided geese directly overhead was taken at 100 (150) mm.

Yo. Everyone else went the other way!

Yo. Everyone else went the other way!

My goal for the rest of the winter is to get at least one decent shot of them all coming back together.

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6 comments on “Canada Geese Taking Off

  1. Naomi says:

    I love that last picture!

  2. BuntyMcC says:

    Thanks, Naomi. If the sun is out and low in the sky their bellies have a golden glow. Rhat’s the picture I really want!

  3. pix & kardz says:

    how cool is this. i once did some research on Canada geese and was surprised to learn that some of them don’t migrate. here’s proof! thanks for sharing.

    • BuntyMcC says:

      I suspect that these actually migrate to PEI from somewhere further north! Last winter, which was so awful all across Canada, and which started early, they didn’t stay in the river by our house at all. We assume they went further south for food because all the fields where they feed over the winter were well covered in snow and ice until March.

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