P.E.I flowers on Canada Day

Oriental poppy.  There's also one salmon coloured one which has 'invaded' my white and blue bed.

Oriental poppy. There’s also one salmon coloured one which has ‘invaded’ my white and blue bed.

I embarked on a project two days ago to photograph every blooming flower in my garden. I missed a couple: the last few forget-me-nots, a salmon-pink oriental poppy, and a self-seeding pink/purple poppy that just started to bloom.

Herewith – red, white, (the colours of Canada’s flag) pink, purple, blue, yellow:

Spirea - bridal wreath.

Spirea – bridal wreath.

A Cornus.  Grows as a layered tree.

A Cornus. Grows as a layered tree.

Achillea, wild, and invasive, grows around some of the edges of the beds.

Achillea, wild, and invasive, grows around some of the edges of the beds.

A white Iris, a gift.

A white Iris, a gift.

Vernon Bridge Garden Canada Day

First bug eaten flowers on a Potentilla shrub.

First bug eaten flowers on a Potentilla shrub.

Blanche Double de Coubert. A species rose shrub that grows to 2+ meters tall and 3 meters wide.

Blanche Double de Coubert. A species rose shrub that grows to 2+ meters tall and 3 meters wide.

Rosa Blanche Double de Coubert.   Large shrub with the most beautifully scented roses I know.

Rosa Blanche Double de Coubert . Large shrub with the most beautifully scented roses I know.

Rosa Blanche Double de Coubert.   Large shrub with the most beautifully scented roses I know.

Rosa Blanche Double de Coubert. Large shrub with the most beautifully scented roses I know.

Rosa rubra

Rosa rubra

Rosa rubra.

Rosa rubra.

Armeria maritima. Belongs on the seaside, not in my garden.

Armeria maritima. Belongs on the seaside, not in my garden.

Geranium amongst blue iris, the Rosa rubrum, and a new Rhododendron which didn't like last winter.

Geranium amongst blue iris, the Rosa rubrum, and a new Rhododendron which didn’t like last winter.

Dark peony (lying down) over Dianthus (pinks)

Dark peony (lying down) over Dianthus (pinks)

Weigela

Weigela

Geranium. Scented. Spreads but easy to control.

Geranium. Scented. Spreads but easy to control.

Chives.

Chives.

Hesperis matronalis, Dame's Rocket, Invasive

Hesperis matronalis, Dame’s Rocket, Invasive

Sage. Salvia officinalis.

Sage. Salvia officinalis.

Bearded iris.

Bearded iris.

Bearded iris. I divided these last spring and they still haven't come back the way they were.

Bearded iris. I divided these last spring and they still haven’t come back the way they were.

Aquilegia ? - aka columbine. Self seeding. Almost black and difficult to photograph

Aquilegia ? – aka columbine. Self seeding. Almost black and difficult to photograph

Comfrey

Comfrey

Viola tricolor - Johnny jump-ups

Viola tricolor – Johnny jump-ups

Geranium species. Possibly Johnson's blue - I forget.

Geranium species. Possibly Johnson’s blue – I forget.

Centauria montana- which I interplant with Hosta to hide the scraggly end to the centaurea.

Centauria montana – which I interplant with Hosta to hide the scraggly end to the centaurea.

Light pink peony backed with a blue iris.

Light pink peony backed with a blue iris.

An abstract take on the blue iris.

An abstract take on the blue iris.

 Iris pseudacorus, invasive. Self seeds everywhere.

Iris pseudacorus, invasive. Self seeds everywhere.

Tomato

Tomato

Lovage.  Like celery but 2 meters tall.

Lovage. Like celery but 2 meters tall.

Alchemilla mollis; Ladies' mantle.

Alchemilla mollis; Ladies’ mantle.

Photographer’s notes: I’m not a morning person, and much of the garden is in shade late in the afternoon so these photos were not taken at the best time: between 9am and 11am ‘daylight saving’ time on a cloudless hot day. There was also a strong breeze (see the Achillea photo) AND one bed is next to the road where ferry traffic flew by tossing every flower (see Lovage, white iris.) Oh, and there were mosquitoes which made it hard to hold the camera still when there were flowers I couldn’t get to with the tripod (see Potentilla!). Excuses, excuses.
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Postscript: Lupins grow everywhere on PEI, but are being overtaken in some places – including the ‘wild’ part of my garden – with Dame’s Rocket, an invasive whose Latin name is Hesperis matronal is. These lupins were at the farm of the suppliers of my CSA (Community supported agriculture) box.

Lupins. In every roadside ditch and bank. Being overrun by Dame's rocket is some places.

Lupins. In every roadside ditch and bank. Being overrun by Dame’s rocket is some places.

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8 comments on “P.E.I flowers on Canada Day

  1. Candia says:

    Love the dark peonies. Also hadn’t heard the name Johnny- Jump-Ups..Lovely abstract take on the iris.

    • buntymcc says:

      Thanks. All my peonies are inherited. Wouldn’t grow them by choice; big, blowsy, a mess after rain…but, admittedly, a nice comtrast to spiky iris and the delicate pinks.

  2. Norma Segreto says:

    wow such a beautiful garden variety of flowers .On my visit to PEI I would love to do a walk through of your garden

  3. Sandy Jess says:

    Love your flower photos! Thanks for sharing! Happy Canada Day!

  4. c-rock@rogers.com says:

    Beautiful, especially the lupins.

    Cheers,

    Carol

    >

  5. You have lovely gardens. Really enjoyed that moment on PEI.

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