Chongqing, China

After a four-night, three-day cruise up the Yangtze river, we docked at Chongqing, boarded a bus and were taken to see the city’s tourist attractions. All five photos in this post were shot through a bus window at one time or another during the day.

Smog obscures the highways and buildings of the Chongqing riverside.

Smog obscures the highways and buildings of the Chongqing riverside.

Chongqing (pronounced Chong/ching) (formerly Romanized as Chungking) is one of four direct-controlled municipalities (the other three are Beijing, Shanghai and Tianjin) in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). This means Chongqing doesn’t report to a province or other level of government, but straight to the centre.

The municipality is said to be the largest in China in both area and population. It reaches a width of 470 kilometres (290 mi) from east to west, and a length of 450 km (280 mi) from north to south. The central city’s population is about 30 million with the greater area exceeding 35 million.

This Guardian article is eight years old, and a little long, but looks at the effect of rapid urbanization in China on a cross section of Chinese people living in Chongqing.

Colours muted by the smog

Colours muted by the smog.

Another example of the engineering prowess of the Chinese.

Another example of the engineering prowess of the Chinese.

During World War II and the Sino-Japanese war (1937-1945) Chongqing was the provisional capital of China and the headquarters of Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang (KMT) government. More than 50 embassies moved to Chongqing with him at that time.  The building below probably predates even that period.

An older part of Chongqing, which would have been interesting to explore.

An older part of Chongqing, which would have been interesting to explore. Sigh.

People work hard in China, and the picture below shows typical tree protection and planting work beside highways. In fact, trees that I would have considered as fully grown, still had their tripod supports.

The roadsides and medians throughout China were 98% immaculate.

The roadsides and medians throughout China were 98% immaculate.

Next post: Pandas!

Advertisements

2 comments on “Chongqing, China

  1. Love the photos! Thanks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s