What is the National Bird of China?

Typical scene arriving in Xi'an from the airport.

Typical scene arriving in Xi’an from the airport.

The first five photos in this post were taken in Xi’an. When we drove from the airport into the centre of the city (remember the lovely city wall from 5 posts ago?) there were hundreds and hundreds of unfinished multi-storey buildings. Not only unfinished, but no work going on at them. Most had a building crane beside or on top of them. We never did get a straight answer as to why there were so many buildings in that state in Xi’an. I have since read one article that suggested that some cities had overbuilt, expecting influxes of rural Chinese, which had failed to materialize.

Row on row...

Row on row…

One of the rare buildings where work was progressing.  This was near the City Wall.

One of the rare buildings where work was progressing. This was near the City Wall.

So, what is the national bird of China? A Building Crane.

  Only the shells: where have the cranes gone?

Only the shells: where have the cranes gone?

We saw unfinished buildings in other cities, but nowhere near the number we saw in Xi’an.

Here is a finished building, paying homage to an iconic landmark in a European city!

A finished building. Most likely not a residential building.  It was not the only building I saw in China with an Eiffel Tower on the top.

A finished building. Most likely not a residential building. It was not the only building I saw in China with an Eiffel Tower on the top.

 

Our tour included one high-speed train ride: from Xi’an ‘s centre-of-city station to Louoyang.  I wish we could have done all our long  internal trips by train;  they are so much more efficient than airplanes and airports.  These two shots were done through the train window – moving at somewhat less than the highest speed the train was capable of.  The thing to note is all the localized burning – no wonder China is full of smog.

Photo quite heavily processed to show more contrast and colour than was really visible through the smog.

Photo quite heavily processed to show more contrast and colour than was really visible through the smog.

Also highly processed to counteract the smog.

Also highly processed to counteract the smog.

Next post: A reblog of another blogger’s comments on empty cities.

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2 comments on “What is the National Bird of China?

  1. Based on my own observations while in Xi’an, it appears the construction methods for buildings follows these basics: build the concrete superstructure with the scaffolding and cranes going up — then finish the interior and exteriors while dismantling the scaffolding on the way back down.

    • buntymcc says:

      No doubt you are correct. BUT. There was no work going on at 99% of the buildings we passed. Our tour guide confirmed this. She told us it was not due to financial problems but never provided a satisfactory answer. My next post on ghost cities is probably closer to the truth.

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