Unearthing Terracotta Warriors

There was considerable restoration work going on in the first building we were in (the huge one,)

Working in confined spaces.

Working in confined spaces.

The worker on the left is holding a bulb with a narrow shaft for blowing air over something they are excavating.

The worker on the left is holding a bulb with a narrow shaft for blowing air over something they are excavating.

Decades of work still lie ahead.  Row 27 looks to be very damaged.

Decades of work still lie ahead. Row 27 looks to be very damaged.

Head and shoulders, yes, knees and toes - not sure.  This trench was much narrower than most, so perhaps it was still being excavated and they had concentrated on this intact soldier.

Head and shoulders, yes, knees and toes – not sure. This trench was much narrower than most, so perhaps it was still being excavated and they had concentrated on this intact soldier.

The third building we were in seemed to have more complicated groupings of soldiers, and if I rightly recall, held the higher echelons of the military. In terms of photography it was awful. The light levels were even lower than in the first building, and the photos came out a sickly khaki yellow colour. I have converted them to black and white.

The horses were particularly impressive. The decimated and decapitated army, not so much. But it does give you an indication of how much work has been done, and how much more is left to do.

Notice that the soldiers controlling the horses have their hands in position to hold the reins.

Horses and their drovers.

Horses and their drovers.

Lots of work ahead here!

Lots of work ahead here!

We were told that each soldier statue was modelled on a particular person. But (and I'm guessing here) the bodies may have been more standardized. Hence, we have bodies awaiting newly designed heads.

We were told that each soldier statue was modelled on a particular person. But (and I’m guessing here) the bodies may have been more standardized. Hence, we have bodies awaiting newly designed heads.

Next post: Answer to the riddle: “What is the national bird of China?”

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